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Periodic Table's Seventh Row Finally Complete After 4 New Elements Added

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By    |   Monday, 04 Jan 2016 01:06 PM

The periodic table's seventh row is now filled after four new elements were added last week, marking the first additions since 2011.

The periodic table of chemical elements, which often adorns every high school chemistry classroom, is arranged in order of atomic number, usually in rows, so that elements with similar atomic structure or chemical properties appear in vertical columns, according to Google.

Three of the new elements — 115 (ununpentium), 117 (ununseptium), and 118 (ununoctium) — were credited to a team of American and Russian scientists at the Russian Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, The Washington Post reported.

Element 113 (ununtrium) was credited to a team of scientists at the Riken Institute in Japan after an assessment by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry, The Guardian noted. The element names are temporary for now.

"The four new elements, all of which are synthetic, were discovered by slamming lighter nuclei into each other and tracking the following decay of the radioactive superheavy elements," according to The Guardian. "Like other superheavy elements that populate the end of the periodic table, they only exist for fractions of a second before decaying into other elements."

The "superheavy" classification is given to elements with more than 104 protons, according to National Public Radio.

The four new elements were verified on Dec. 30 by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry, which governs chemical nomenclature, terminology, and measurement.

"To scientists, this is of greater value than an Olympic gold medal," Ryoji Noyori, a former Riken president and Nobel laureate in chemistry, told The Guardian.

NPR stated that the elements' temporary names stem from their spots on the periodic table. The discovering teams will have a chance to submit their own names for the new elements.

"There are a couple of laboratories that have already taken shots at making elements 119 and 120 but with no evidence yet of success," Paul Karol, chair of the IUPAC's Joint Working Party, told NPR.

"The eighth period should be very interesting because relativistic effects on electrons become significant and difficult to pinpoint. It is in the electron behavior, perhaps better called electron psychology, that the chemical behavior is embodied," Karol added.

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The periodic table's seventh row is now filled after four new elements were added last week, marking the first additions since 2011.
periodic, table, seventh row, new, elements
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2016-06-04
Monday, 04 Jan 2016 01:06 PM
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