Tags: pangolin | trade | ban | anteater

Pangolin Trade Ban May Help the Little Anteater Survive

Image: Pangolin Trade Ban May Help the Little Anteater Survive

Chinese pangolin rests on a tree branch at a rescue center in Vietnam. (AP Photo/Hau Dinh)

By    |   Friday, 30 Sep 2016 08:38 AM

A pangolin trade ban may help the little anteater survive extinction, or at least that's the hope of 182 countries connected with the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species.

More than a million wild pangolins have been killed over the past 10 years for their meat and scales as a reputed medicine in China and Vietnam, reported The Guardian, and the animal is well on its way to extinction in Asia. Now poachers are killing pangolins in Africa.

The countries joined in the pangolin anti-trade pact at a summit in Johannesburg, South Africa on Wednesday.

"This decision will help give pangolins a fighting chance," Susan Lieberman of the Wildlife Conservation Society told The Guardian. "The world is standing up for the little guy with this pivotal decision. These species need extra protection and now they will get it."

The Telegraph noted that all eight pangolin species are being upgraded to "Appendix I" status under the convention, the highest level of protection which will prevent any

"This is a huge win and rare piece of good news for some of the world's most trafficked and endangered animals," Ginette Hemley of the World Wide Fund told The Telegraph. "Giving pangolins full protection under CITIES will eliminate any question about legality of trade, making it harder for criminals to traffic them and increasing the consequences for those who do."

Some, though, balked at the designation, noted The Guardian. Indonesia opposed the new protection for Sunda and Chinese pangolins. China abstained, saying pangolins are also caught for bushmeat in many countries and that habitat loss is also a factor.

The CITIES website said the group hopes delegates at a global partnership forum can help decide on trade controls affected nearly 500 species of plants and animals moved by criminal syndicates.

"Wildlife crime increasingly involves transnational criminal groups targeting high value species and wildlife and environment agencies cannot beat them alone," said John Scanlon, the secretary-general of the convention. "This forum provided a unique opportunity for officials to directly engage with the organizations that have the mandate, resources and technical expertise to assist countries in combating wildlife crime."

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A pangolin trade ban may help the little anteater survive extinction, or at least that's the hope of 182 countries connected with the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species.
pangolin, trade, ban, anteater
356
2016-38-30
Friday, 30 Sep 2016 08:38 AM
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