Tags: nazi | war | criminals | social security | payments

Nazi War Criminals' Social Security Payments Not Stopped

By    |   Monday, 20 Oct 2014 01:07 PM

Suspected Nazi war criminals and former SS guards were allowed to receive Social Security benefits long after they were forced to leave the United States, The Associated Press said government records revealed.

The news agency said its review of government documents showed that loopholes were granted to persuade Nazi suspects to leave the country. The AP said there are still four receiving benefits, including Martin Hartmann, a former SS guard at the Sachsenhausen camp in Germany, and Jakob Denzinger who guarded the Auschwitz complex in Poland.

"It's absolutely outrageous that Nazi war criminals are continuing to receive Social Security benefits when they have been outlawed from our country for many, many, many years," New York U.S. Rep. Carolyn Maloney told the AP.

Maloney, a member of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, told The AP she plans to introduce legislation to close the loophole.

The AP reported that Hartmann was allowed to move to Berlin in 2007 from Arizona just before his U.S. citizenship was taken away from him. Denzinger left Ohio for Germany in 1989 after learning denaturalization proceedings against him had started, and then skipped to Croatia, noted The AP.

The arrangements let the Justice Department's Office of Special Investigations get around complicated deportation hearings and boost the number of Nazis it expelled from the U.S., noted the AP.

The Office of Special Investigation's was the department's Nazi-hunting unit which operated from 1979 to 2010 when it merged with the Human Rights and Special Prosecutions Section, according to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

The office built civil and criminal cases against suspected Nazi criminals who were believed to have moved to the United States and then sought their denaturalization and deportation. In December 2004, Congress expanded the office's scope to cover alleged crimes after World War II when those suspects could be denied U.S. citizenship as well.

The AP reported that the problem of suspected Nazi criminals receiving social security benefits has been around for a long time, and noted that a 1979 AP study discovered at least 38 of 66 suspects removed from the country kept their Social Security benefits.


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Suspected Nazi war criminals and former SS guards were allowed to receive Social Security benefits long after they were forced to leave the United States, The Associated Press said government records revealed.
nazi, war, criminals, social security, payments
381
2014-07-20
Monday, 20 Oct 2014 01:07 PM
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