Tags: nasa | research | space travel | european space agency | germany

Here's a Job Where You Get Paid for Staying in Bed All Day

a man takes a sleep test while a nurse attends to him
(Emiliano Rodriguez-Mega/AP)

By    |   Tuesday, 16 April 2019 11:20 AM

You can get paid to lie in bed all day. There is just one snag. You will be bed-bound 24 hours a day, seven days a week for 60 days. You will get paid $13 an hour but need to be available for a total of 89 days.

So, what exactly is this dream job that will see you paid to sleep your days away? NASA, the European Space Agency, and the German Aerospace Center are looking for candidates to be part of a study to gain a better understanding of how the body adapts to weightlessness, NPR reported.

The position is based in Cologne, Germany, and is open to women between 24 and 55 years old who speak German. The study even has its own official name: "Artificial Gravity Bed Rest Study."

Participants will be exposed to an artificial gravity test in order for researchers to establish whether or not it can counteract the effects of spaceflight. If it does then this might change future spaceflight missions.

"A lot of people are intrigued about the idea of contributing to advance knowledge that helps us to really have humans live and work in space for extended periods of time," said Jennifer Ngo-Anh of the European Space Agency, according to NPR.

Volunteers will lie in bed with their heads titled slightly downwards, which could be a pain in the neck but is essential in recreating spaceflight conditions.

"When volunteers lie in bed with their heads tilted roughly six degrees below the horizontal, then a lot of the effects that spaceflight has on the human body can be simulated or being reproduced," Ngo-Anh said, according to NPR. "It is not to annoy volunteers, but it is actually to test countermeasures."

The first phase of the project kicked off in 2017 when 12 volunteers spent a month in bed while researchers observed and analyzed the effects of fluid pressure on astronauts' eyes and optic nerves. According to NASA, participants in the study are encouraged to keep their days interesting by setting a goal such as learning a new language or taking a class online. Participants do at least get to keep their phones to stay in touch with the outside world but visitors are not allowed.

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To gain a better understanding of how the body adapts to weightlessness, NASA, the European Space Agency, and the German Aerospace Center are looking for candidates to be part of a study of lying in bed all day, according to NPR.
nasa, research, space travel, european space agency, germany
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2019-20-16
Tuesday, 16 April 2019 11:20 AM
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