Tags: mount everest | human | waste

Mount Everest Human Waste Now Creating a Health Hazard for Climbers

Image: Mount Everest Human Waste Now Creating a Health Hazard for Climbers
Mount Everest with buddhist prayer flags, view from Kala Patthar. (Actrisavesna/Dreamstime.com)

By    |   Tuesday, 03 Mar 2015 11:48 AM

Mount Everest human waste has made scaling the peak more difficult, according to Nepal mountaineering association officials who say climbers have left the slopes littered with trash, feces, and urine.

Hundreds of people attempt to conquer Mount Everest each year during its mountaineering season, which runs from March to May, according to Sky News. Scaling the mountain remains a dangerous adventure, and half of the climbing season was canceled last year after 16 local guides died in an April avalanche.

Now, topping the list of dangers is the debris and human waste left behind by climbers, which is now creating a health hazard.

Arun Krishnamurthy, writing for The Hindu in February, said climbers have turned Mount Everest into a "garbage pile" and should take responsibility for cleaning it up if they plan to continue climbing.

"Imagine watching the snow-clad slopes and green plains below from the top or picture the sky from up there, also imagine how you would feel if you saw a dead corpse, sleeping bags, and piles of leftover human trash at this natural monument," Krishnamurthy wrote.

"It is sad how we humans consume and pollute on a daily basis with absolutely no guilt. Would we enjoy eating a plate of trash or sleeping on a bed of trash? Looking at the rate at which we are generating garbage it seems, in the future we would have no choice but to grow food, build houses-schools-hospitals all on dump yards and live a life surrounded by garbage," he continued.

The Nepal government started imposing new rules in 2014 requiring each climber to bring down to the base camp 8 kilograms (17.6 pounds) of garbage — the amount it estimates a climber discards along the route, Sky News reported. Climbers risk losing a $4,000 deposit if they do not bring down that amount of garbage from the mountain.

Puspa Raj Katuwal, the head of the government's mountaineering department, told Sky News, though, that Nepal has not yet come up with a plan to handle the human waste situation.

Dawa Steven Sherpa, who took charge of Everest cleanup expeditions in 2008, told Sky News that some climbers carry disposable travel toilet bags to use in the higher camps.

"It is a health hazard and the issue needs to be addressed," he said.

© 2017 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

   
1Like our page
2Share
TheWire
Mount Everest human waste has made scaling the peak more difficult, according to Nepal mountaineering association officials who say climbers have left the slopes littered with trash, feces, and urine.
mount everest, human, waste
383
2015-48-03
Tuesday, 03 Mar 2015 11:48 AM
Newsmax Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved