Tags: mh370 | lead | scientist | crash

MH370 Lead Scientist Discounts Linking Crash With 'Oomph' Sound

By    |   Thursday, 05 Jun 2014 09:45 AM

Researchers are examining an unusual underwater "oomph" sound recorded in Australia the day Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 disappeared but a lead scientist said he doubts the sound is connected with the aircraft.

The low-frequency "oomph" was recorded by listening devices in the Indian Ocean off Australia's west coast on March 8, the day the airplane with 239 passengers went missing, according to The Telegraph.

The airliner left Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia on its way to Beijing when it disappeared. Researchers at Australia's Curtin University are trying to determine if the sound came from the plane crashing into the ocean.

Urgent: Do You Approve Or Disapprove of President Obama's Job Performance? Vote Now in Urgent Poll

Alec Duncan, the lead scientist at Curtin's Centre for Marine Science and Technology, said that the chances were slim that the sound is connected with the missing airliner. Duncan added that he believed there's a greater chance the sound came from a "small underwater seismic event."

Curtin scientists told The Associated Press that the recorders are normally used for environmental research, such as studying whale sounds. The data showed on the night the airplane went missing was a signal that they initially thought might be the plane crashing into the ocean.

Duncan said that scientists tried to refine the data further and realized the sound started somewhere south of India, an area well outside the arc where researchers believe the plane probably crashed.

"It's now looking as if it's unlikely to be due to the aircraft because it seems to be too far out into the ocean," Duncan said.

The AP reported that the Joint Agency Coordination Center said the Australian Transport Safety Bureau had already reviewed the findings of the sound with the Curtin team.

"However, Curtin University has concluded, and the ATSB agrees, that the current results are not compatible with the international search team's analysis of the most likely area where MH370 entered the water," the agency said in an email.

An analysis of satellite data led investigators to initially believe that the airliner crashed in a remote area of the Indian Ocean, roughly 1,405 miles northwest of Perth, Australia, but searches turned up nothing since the crash.

Urgent: Assess Your Heart Attack Risk in Minutes. Click Here.

© 2017 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

   
1Like our page
2Share
TheWire
Researchers are examining an unusual underwater "oomph" sound recorded in Australia the day Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 disappeared but a lead scientist said he doubts the sound is connected with the aircraft.
mh370, lead, scientist, crash
377
2014-45-05
Thursday, 05 Jun 2014 09:45 AM
Newsmax Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved