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Tags: in vitrio | babies | vascular | risks

In Vitro Babies Share Vascular Risk as Teens, New Study Finds

illustration of baby in womb
Babies conceived through in vitro fertilization could experience greater cardiovascular risks as teens, a new study found. (Dreamstime)

By    |   Thursday, 20 September 2018 11:08 AM

Babies conceived through in vitro fertilization could experience greater cardiovascular risks as teens, a new study released this month found, according to NPR.

The research, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, discovered that adolescents conceived with assisted reproductive technologies (ART) were more likely to develop high blood pressure, which is known to increase the risk of later stroke and heart attack.

ART encompasses various procedures, including in vitro fertilization, used to help couples conceive.

In a study with mice, researchers found ART-induced premature vascular aging, which can occur in otherwise healthy children, evolved into arterial hypertension.

Researchers tracked 54 children for several years and found that, of 52 teens conceived with technological help, eight had high blood pressure. In comparison, only one of 43 teens conceived naturally had the same hypertension.

The latest report follows a 2012 study by the same researchers, led by Urs Scherrer, a visiting professor at the University of Bern in Switzerland.

In that major paper, the team of experts found that 65 healthy children conceived through ART displayed "generalized vascular dysfunction."

Scherrer noted that fertility clinics should "counsel about potential risks for their kids," according to NPR.

The Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology said that more than 71 000 babies were born in the U.S. through ART in 2016.

The numbers reflect a growing trend that is in direct relation to a dramatic drop in fertility rates nationwide.

Earlier this year NPR reported that the general fertility rate hit a record low of 60.2 births per 1,000 women between the ages of 15 and 44.

This marked a 3 percent drop from 2016, which is why more couples are turning to ART.

Scherrer recommended that doctors monitor children conceived with ART.

"Every general practitioner should ask about your fetal and neonatal history," he said, according to NPR, noting that the reproductive techniques "will have important effects on your future disease risk."

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Babies conceived through in vitro fertilization could experience greater cardiovascular risks as teens, a new study released this month found.
in vitrio, babies, vascular, risks
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2018-08-20
Thursday, 20 September 2018 11:08 AM
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