Tags: hurricane harvey | flesh-eating | bacteria | death

Hurricane Harvey Flesh-Eating Bacteria Kills Texas Woman

Image: Hurricane Harvey Flesh-Eating Bacteria Kills Texas Woman

A man returns from the grocery store through high water along a street in Orange, Texas as the state slowly moves toward recovery from the devastation of Hurricane Harvey on Sept. 6, 2017. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

By    |   Thursday, 28 September 2017 12:01 PM

Hurricane Harvey floodwaters containing flesh-eating bacteria led to the death of a Houston woman who became infected after a fall, the Houston Chronicle reported.

According to the Chronicle, autopsy results have confirmed that Nancy Reed, 77, died Sept. 15 as a result of flesh-eating bacteria, also known as necrotizing fasciitis. Reed contracted the bacteria when she fell in her son's flooded home and cut her arm. After the injury became infected, Reed was treated at Memorial Hermann Hospital-The Woodlands, and then moved to Memorial Hermann Hospital-Texas Medical Center, where she later succumbed to the disease.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention describes necrotizing fasciitis as "deadly" and explains that it spreads quickly and kills the body's soft tissue. According to the CDC, the bacteria that can cause necrotizing fasciitis are often found in floodwaters as a result of overflowing sewerage systems.

"It's tragic. This is one of the things we'd been worrying about once the flooding began, that something like this might occur. My heart goes out to the family," Dr. David Persse, director of the city's emergency medical services, said, according to the Chronicle.

The Chronicle noted that Reed was well known as a kind, caring member of the Kingswood community in Houston who was active in her church and worked with the Village Learning and Achievement Center and the Upbring Krause Children's Center.

Reed's death is the second known case of a flesh-eating bacteria infection related to the floodwaters from Hurricane Harvey, the Chronicle said. Former firefighter and paramedic J.R. Atkins was contaminated through an insect bite on his arm while rescuing Missouri City neighbors during the flooding. Fortunately, Atkins survived the infection.

More than 75 deaths in Texas have been attributed to Hurricane Harvey and its aftermath.

Twitter users shared concerns about flesh-eating bacteria.

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Hurricane Harvey floodwaters containing flesh-eating bacteria led to the death of a Houston woman who became infected after a fall, the Houston Chronicle reported.
hurricane harvey, flesh-eating, bacteria, death
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2017-01-28
Thursday, 28 September 2017 12:01 PM
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