Tags: david meade | fake | moon landing | conspiracy

Faked Moon-Landing Conspiracy Lives On Thanks to David Meade

Faked Moon-Landing Conspiracy Lives On Thanks to David Meade
 (Pavel Buzev/Dreamstime.com)

By    |   Wednesday, 23 May 2018 01:27 PM

The faked moon-landing conspiracy lives on, and at its helm now is notorious doomsday forecaster David Meade – who blames his mother for helping plant that seed.

For years conspiracy theorists have believed that NASA’s monumental 1969 moon landing was faked, and that Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin acted out their mission on a secret film set, Time reported.

Their theory is that the landing was faked by the government in a desperate attempt to make it appear that the U.S. was beating Russia in the space race.

That’s good enough for Meade, who is now saying that Armstrong couldn’t have stepped out of Apollo 11 to become the first man on the moon because the space capsule wouldn't have been able to penetrate a radiation zone above the Earth without exposing the occupants to lethal doses of radiation, The Express reported.

The radiation belt Meade refers to is known as the Van Allen zone which, according to NASA, are "two donuts of seething radiation that surround Earth."

These belts grow and shrink in response to incoming energy from the sun and sometimes can swell up to expose satellites in low-Earth orbit to damaging radiation.

Meade, who said that even his mother believed that the moon-landing was a fake, noted that the radiation belt would have been impenetrable to the Apollo 11 mission.

"Guess what? Without nuclear protection, it appears that a biologic life form such as a human cannot pass through these belts," he said, according to The Express.

"That is, of course, unless there are six feet of lead to shield from the radiation. The Apollo spacecraft had no such shielding. Is this the most simple way to prove that no missions went through the Van Allen Belt? Is this world controlled by sociopaths who have no concern for the truth? That’s the bottom-line question," he continued.

"Have we been subject to a series of lies ever since the 1960s? That’s what Eisenhower warned us about."

NASA has dismissed Meade’s latest theory, saying there was no threat to the Apollo 11 mission because radiation exposure in the Van Allen zone was minimal at the time.

Meade meanwhile has famously been predicting the end of the world, but his dates keep being re-adjusted.

First he said a planet called Nibiru, or Planet X, was hurtling toward Earth and would destroy it.

Later he claimed it was just passing close by.

Then he said the end of the world was back on, warning that believers would be absorbed into the heavens while nonbelievers would be left behind to die over a period of about five months.

He theorized that the sun, moon and Jupiter, which supposedly represents the Messiah, would end up in the constellation Virgo.

This was last month, but the world did not end.

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TheWire
The faked moon-landing conspiracy lives on, and at its helm now is notorious doomsday forecaster David Meade – who blames his mother for helping plant that seed.
david meade, fake, moon landing, conspiracy
471
2018-27-23
Wednesday, 23 May 2018 01:27 PM
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