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8 Common Myths About the US Constitution

8 Common Myths About the US Constitution
(Oleg Dudko/Dreamstime.com)

By    |   Friday, 23 August 2019 09:37 AM

The U.S. Constitution is one of the most significant documents in American history, but many Americans don’t know some of the basic facts and believe long-standing myths.

Example: You may believe that Thomas Jefferson and John Adams signed the Constitution when in fact they didn't, as both were out of the country at the time, Constitution Daily notes.

Here we take a closer look at 7 other common myths about the U.S. Constitution:

All 13 states participated in writing the Constitution. There were 13 states in 1787, but Rhode Island was not on board. The state did not send a delegation to Philadelphia in fear that it would be dominated by the new federal government, Reader's Digest explained.

The Constitution has 39 signatures. Reader's Digest noted that, while there are 39 delegate signatures on the Constitution, the document also contains the signature of the Convention’s secretary, William Jackson, for authentication.

The convention delegates approved the Constitution unanimously. While 42 delegates gathered at the Pennsylvania State House in 1787 for the signing ceremony, three Founders were not happy with the final document and refused to sign the Constitution, Constitution Daily reported. They were Elbridge Gerry, George Mason, and Edmund Randolph.

The Constitution was written on hemp paper. The document was written on parchment, not hemp, according to Constitution Daily. Paper was commonly made from hemp at the time that the Constitution was written, which is where this myth came from.

The Founders who wrote the Declaration wrote the Constitution. Despite this popular belief, only six Founders who signed the Declaration of Independence also signed the Constitution, Constitution Daily reported. They were George Clymer, Benjamin Franklin, Robert Morris, George Read, James Wilson, and Roger Sherman.

The Constitution ensures your right to vote. The Constitution highlights the reasons why you cannot be denied the right to vote but does not actually ensure your right to vote, according to Reader's Digest. A vote may be withheld if the reasons given are not in contradiction to what the Constitution says.

The Constitution gives the Supreme Court the power to declare laws unconstitutional. As Reader's Digest points out, no mention of judicial review is made in the Constitution.

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The U.S. Constitution is one of the most significant documents in American history, but many Americans don't know some of the basic facts and believe long-standing myths. Here is a closer look at 7 other common myths about the document.
constitution, myths, facts
362
2019-37-23
Friday, 23 August 2019 09:37 AM
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