Tags: comcast | tor | web | browser | welcome

Comcast: Tor Web Browser Welcome, Along With All Others

By    |   Tuesday, 16 Sep 2014 08:01 AM

Comcast has denied rumors that it prohibits the use of Tor, a web browser that allows more privacy while surfing the Internet, and happens to be popular among cybercriminals.

"Comcast is not asking customers to stop using Tor, or any other browser for that matter," the company said in a company blog post on Monday.

"We have no policy against Tor, or any other browser or software. Customers are free to use their Xfinity Internet service to visit any website, use any app, and so forth . . . Comcast doesn’t monitor our customer’s browser software, web surfing or online history."

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Thinly-sourced reports that Comcast representatives were asking users to steer clear of using Tor proliferated on several privacy-oriented blogs and websites over the weekend, and that appears to have prompted the official statement from Comcast.

According to Business Insider, roughly 1.2 million people use Tor to browse the web. Tor — a modified version of Firefox — is an acronym for "The Onion Router," and helps anonymize web traffic by routing it through a series of intermediaries, making it difficult if not impossible to trace a person's surfing habits. The Washington Post noted that the U.S. National Security Administration (NSA) has reportedly not been able to crack the Tor infrastructure as of yet. 

In the past, Tor has been primarily associated with criminal activity, and is used heavily by users buying drugs in online black markets like Silk Road. By using Tor to find dealers and Bitcoin to make their transactions, users could buy drugs or other items fairly easily without being traced.

Despite or because of its associations with illicit activity, many technology advocates have been actively promoting Tor and other privacy-oriented software for legal activity.

Corporate executives of blue chip companies, for example, have begun using encrypted text-messaging apps like Wickr to protect company secrets from hackers, as well as encrypted email, and web browsers like Tor.

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Comcast has denied rumors that it prohibits the use of Tor, a web browser that allows more privacy while surfing the Internet, and happens to be popular among cybercriminals.
comcast, tor, web, browser, welcome
345
2014-01-16
Tuesday, 16 Sep 2014 08:01 AM
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