Tags: amelia earhart | skeletal | remains | castaway

Amelia Earhart Castaway Theory Bolstered by Skeletal Remains

Image: Amelia Earhart Castaway Theory Bolstered by Skeletal Remains

Amelia Earhart stands June 14, 1928 in front of her bi-plane called "Friendship" in Newfoundland. (Getty Images)

By    |   Wednesday, 02 Nov 2016 05:41 AM

The Amelia Earhart theory that the female pilot died not in a plane crash, but as a castaway on a remote island has been bolstered by new evidence. 

Earhart, who went missing in 1937 while trying to become the first female pilot to fly around the world, reportedly made more than 100 radio transmissions and even made contact with operators after she was last heard from on July 2, the International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR) announced in August, according to news.com.au.

“People started hearing radio distress calls from the airplane and they were verified,” Ric Gillespie of TIGHAR told an audience during an August talk he gave North Carolina, according to the Daily Mail.

This indicates that she perhaps landed safely on a Pacific island and, now, new evidence has emerged that supports the theory.

A new analysis by forensic examiner Jeff Glickman links skeletal remains found on the island of Nikumaroro in 1940 to Earhart based on the ratio of arm bones.

When the remains were first examined in 1940, a doctor concluded that they belonged to a male. But TIGHAR researchers re-analyzed files on the remains in 1998 and came to the conclusion that they could possibly be consistent with Earhart, USA Today reported. 

Glickman's new examination, made based on photos of Earhart, solidified the link, TIGHAR said in a statement last month.

Earhart’s “humerus to radius ratio was 0.76 — virtually identical to the castaway’s,” TIGHAR said of Glickman's conclusions.

“The match does not, of course, prove that the castaway was Amelia Earhart, but it is a significant new data point that tips the scales further in that direction,” TIGHAR continued.

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The Amelia Earhart theory that the female pilot died not in a plane crash, but as a castaway on a remote island has been bolstered by new evidence.
amelia earhart, skeletal, remains, castaway
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2016-41-02
Wednesday, 02 Nov 2016 05:41 AM
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