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We Can All Agree: Trump a Most Consequential President

We Can All Agree: Trump a Most Consequential President

President Donald Trump during a meeting with Republican lawmakers in the Cabinet Room of the White House, Tuesday, June 26, 2018, in Washington, D.C. (Evan Vucci/AP)

By Tuesday, 26 June 2018 02:20 PM Current | Bio | Archive

TW III. "That Was The Week That Was," a political satire show using music and humor to skewer all the newsmakers of the time. What time? The early 1960’s.

The writers included David Frost and Gloria Steinem. (Go figure).

Once in a while there is a very consequential week. The Cuban missile crisis took too many days. Two atomic bombs in one week is more than consequential. We just had one more of those; consequential weeks, not atomic bombs. And here I am connecting all the dots. One day the historians will view the week of June 10 to June 17, 2018 as the jumping off point for the post World War II reset and for the 21st century.

Let’s start at the very beginning:

It’s June 10 and the G-7 meeting is just wrapping up. The usual communique is written so people will know that nothing happened, nothing will happen, and any and all decisions that need to be made will be cans kicked down the road to the G-7 successors. Or not.

You see, there’s this guy named Trump, President Trump to the deniers, and he just doesn’t get this whole can-kicking exercise.

Donald J. Trump had a different idea.

He thought that the G-7 relationships, going back to the end of World War II, were no longer applicable. He suggested that the premise of those relationships was that everybody benefits at the expense (literally) of the United States. No mas.

President Trump argued that free trade was not fair trade and the American middle class was subsidizing the Canadians and Europeans. Presidents Trump and Trudeau (Canada) started a global shouting match leading to a global trade war leading to — who knows.

So let me say it for the first time. I don’t know how our trade relationships are going to end up. But I do know one thing. We’re not going back. The past is dead and the future is coming at us. Hold on.

Two days later it’s Singapore and Kim Jong Un of North Korea.

For all the can kickers in the world, the Koreans are a major triumph. North and South Korea are still separated. The Korean War "ended" in 1953. President Trump decided it’s time to have a global discussion on nuclear proliferation, and we, the Americans, will now take the negative. In other words, President Trump went to make Kim Jong Un an offer he couldn’t refuse.

Give up your nukes and you get to keep your job and your country.

There were handshakes all around.

The pundits ran the gamut from peace to bluff, from victory to sucker. So let me repeat: I don’t know how our nuclear proliferation demands are going to end up. But I do know one thing. We’re not going back. The past is dead and the future is coming at us. Hold on.

And that got us to Thursday, June 14, President Trump’s 72nd birthday and the release of the much anticipated Office of the Inspector General of the Federal Bureau of Investigation report. Apparently, while nobody was watching, the relationship between the executive branch of the U.S. government and its subordinate Intelligence agencies changed.

It seemed like President Trump had no ability to hire, fire, and move the chairs around at the Department of Justice (DOJ). There were rumors of rogue FBI agents using improper procedures to try to affect a presidential election.

There were rumors of illegitimate leaking and partisan investigations.

There was speculation of campaign spies and campaign confidential informants. And the there was the inspector general’s report. There was something for everyone. Republicans got to read the quotes from FBI agents that were clearly pro-Clinton and anti-Trump.

The Democrats got to read the report’s conclusion that those quotes did not affect the investigations. America got to read about an FBI it didn’t fully recognize. And Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., who is anti Trump got to ask the country, "Where’s my FBI?"

So once again I repeat. I don’t know how our intelligence oversight is going to end up. But I do know one thing. We’re not going back. The past is dead and the future is coming at us. Hold on.

Now is not the time to draw conclusions. But there is one thing we can all agree on.

Donald Trump, love him or hate him, is one very consequential president.

And the Clinton’s, Bushes and Obama’s are rapidly fading from our memory.

So one more time: I don’t know how trade relationships, nuclear proliferation and Intelligence oversight is going to end up. But I do know one thing. We’re not going back. The past is dead and the future is coming at us. Hold on. It might take years (or even decades) for the dust to settle because June 10 to June 17, 2018, "That Was The Week That Was" III.

Sid Dinerstein is a former chairman of the Palm Beach County Republican Party. He founded JBS Associates, a 600-person financial service company, and currently combines politics and business with Niger Innis in Inclusive Elections LLC, a firm that brings urban electorate voters to the GOP. He is the author of "Adults Only: For Those Who Love Their Country More Than Their Party." For more of his reports, Go Here Now.

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SidDinerstein
There is one thing we can all agree on. Donald Trump, love him or hate him, is one very consequential president, and we’re not going back. The past is dead and the future is coming at us. Hold on. It might take decades for the dust to settle.
fbi, g7, doj, kim, singapore
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2018-20-26
Tuesday, 26 June 2018 02:20 PM
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