Tags: Presidential History | Conservative | Conservatives | Democrats | Goldwater

Is Conservatism Dead?

By Monday, 22 February 2016 09:55 AM Current | Bio | Archive

Read my lips, no new justices!

I used to be a conservative. But no more. I'm simply too good for them. And so are you.

I'm an occasional history buff. My favorite historical accounts are the ones I write myself. Enjoy.

The modern conservative movement began in 1964. Sen. Barry Goldwater beat Gov. Nelson Rockefeller for the Republican presidential nomination. It was a glorious and important moment in American political history.

After all, the last thing America needed was two socialist (Democratic) parties.

But while this modern conservative movement wasn't stillborn, it came with a severe birth defect. Senator Goldwater, seeing a clash of principles, voted against the landmark 1964 Civil Rights Act. As a presidential nominee it defined the Republican Party as the ultimate protector of property rights, even as those rights became a wall, allowing (Democratic) bigots to keep out people whose sole indiscretion was the color of their skin.

The link to our fabulous and moral foundation as abolitionists was shattered.

Republican Martin Luther King, Jr. publicly denounced the vote.

Here we are fifty years later and we still remain incapable of sharing our values with those who need them the most.

Goldwater's 39 percent popular vote gave Lyndon Johnson the power to change large chunks of the minority population from upwardly mobile to permanently dependent. And we had neither the moral authority nor the political clout to stop it.

The Democrats broke up the black families and emasculated the young, Black males while creating unsafe ghettos, underperforming schools and an unarmed urban citizenry.

And for all those ruinous policies the Democrats got up to 90 percent of the black vote. (Romney got  seven percent).

Fast forward to Richard Nixon and his Philadelphia Plan, the Republican contribution to affirmative action, quotas and the “soft bigotry of low expectations.”

Ultimately we arrived at conservatism's finest hour, Ronald Reagan beating Jimmy Carter. Ronald Reagan could actually explain why capitalism would beat socialism every time. Ronald Reagan was America's last world leader. All who followed — either party — made us smaller.

If Barry Goldwater's vote against the 1964 Civil Rights Act was the single worst vote by a Republican, consider this. George Bush Sr's unilateral surrender on income tax rates was the beginning of the end of the conservative movement.

If a Republican president puts appeasing the Democrats above economic freedom then we stand for nothing. We turned to Bob Dole in 1996, a man who Newt Gingrich labeled the “tax collector for the Welfare State.”

We elected “W” in 2004 and 2008 and saw just how much a conservative could spend.

Nation building, amnesty, and Medicare Part D made “W” the greatest Republican spender ever. George W. Bush even traded away school choice for a photo op with Teddy Kennedy.

And when the Liberal housing and banking policies brought our economy down, “W” blamed the no longer existent free market as the Democrats danced on our philosophical grave.

We turned to John “I voted against the Bush tax cuts” McCain. He would have won if he opposed the TARP (big government) and chose Main Street over Wall street.

Mitt Romney is a very accomplished man. But he had no idea about how to share our values with those who need them the most. He wrote off the growing part of the electorate with his insulting "47 percent" comment.

So, is conservatism dead?

If not, who are its leaders: Boehner, Ryan, Jeb, Marco, Cruz?

Can a leader call himself a conservative if he picks and chooses which laws to support?

Doesn't Amnesty for Illegals automatically deny you the use of the word conservative?

Furthermore, can any philosophy exist if there are no principles for which it will fight?

In other words, if every public policy fight becomes a conservative surrender so the Democrats and their media flacks won't blame us for a government shutdown, then what difference does it make what we pretend to believe in.

We won't fight for the life of the unborn. (Planned Parenthood got all their money).

We won't fight for a balanced budget. (President Obama got every cent he wanted plus Paul Ryan's public humiliation). Obamacare is intact. (We didn't even pass a bill eliminating the penalties).

You get the picture. We have no leaders and no fight-to-the-death issues.

Except, one — Scalia's replacement. conservatism will continue to live and breathe if the next president makes the appointment. Conservatism is dead if president Obama makes the appointment. It's binary.

And Mitch McConnell is the man in the cross hairs.

Mitch, if you're paying attention, here goes: Read my lips, now new justices!

Either that or give the movement to Donald Trump.

Sid Dinerstein is a former chairman of the Palm Beach County Republican Party. He founded JBS Associates, a 600-person financial service company, and currently combines politics and business with Niger Innis in Inclusive Elections LLC, a firm that brings urban electorate voters to the GOP. He is the author of "Adults Only: For Those Who Love Their Country More Than Their Party." For more of his reports, Go Here Now.



 

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SidDinerstein
The modern conservative movement began in 1964. Here we are fifty years later and we still remain incapable of sharing our values with those who need them the most.
Conservative, Conservatives, Democrats, Goldwater
844
2016-55-22
Monday, 22 February 2016 09:55 AM
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