Tags: Immigration | Mexico | civics | naturalization | pew

42 Percent of Eligible Mexican Immigrants Are US Citizens

42 Percent of Eligible Mexican Immigrants Are US Citizens
(Larry Gevert/Dreamstime)

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Wednesday, 31 January 2018 03:22 PM Current | Bio | Archive

Among the six million lawful Mexican immigrants eligible for U.S. citizenship, 42 percent have become naturalized U.S. citizens.[1]

The share of Mexican immigrants seeking citizenship is far lower than for immigrants from other countries. According to the Pew Research Center, 75 percent of non-Mexican immigrants have become naturalized U.S. citizens.

Pew research indicates several reasons lawful Mexican immigrants do not go through the naturalization process. The reasons include "a lack of English proficiency, limited interest in applying for citizenship and the financial cost of the application." Pew adds that "close geographic proximity of origin countries to the U.S. may lower naturalization rates, in part because immigrants from countries near the U.S. are more likely to maintain strong ties to their countries of origin, increasing the likelihood that they move back to their home country without ever obtaining U.S. citizenship."

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To apply for citizenship, immigrants must be 18 or older, have been a legal permanent resident of the United States for five consecutive years, and meet certain residency requirements. Also, applicants must "be able to read, write, and speak English and have knowledge and an understanding of U.S. history and government (civics)." Finally, an individual applying for citizenship must "be a person of good moral character, attached to the principles of the Constitution of the United States, and well disposed to the good order and happiness of the United States during all relevant periods under the law." [2]

During the period from 2005 to 2015, 8.5 million immigrants applied for citizenship. Nearly a million applications were denied (11 percent of the total).

At the end of 2015, there were 19.8 million naturalized citizens living in the United States, 11.9 million lawful immigrants, and 11.0 million illegal immigrants.[3]

Footnotes:

  1. Pew Research Center, "Naturalization rate among U.S. immigrants up since 2005, with India among the biggest gainers," January 18, 2018
  2. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, "Path to U.S. Citizenship," accessed January 30, 2018

Pew Research Center, "5 facts about illegal immigration in the U.S.," April 27, 2017

Each weekday, Scott Rasmussen’s Number of the Day explores interesting and newsworthy topics at the intersection of culture, politics, and technology. Columns published on Ballotpedia reflect the views of the author.

Scott Rasmussen is founder and president of the Rasmussen Media Group. He is the author of "Mad as Hell: How the Tea Party Movement Is Fundamentally Remaking Our Two-Party System," "In Search of Self-Governance," and "The People’s Money: How Voters Will Balance the Budget and Eliminate the Federal Debt." Read more reports from Scott Rasmussen — Click Here Now.

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At the end of 2015, there were 19.8 million naturalized citizens living in the United States, 11.9 million lawful immigrants, and 11.0 million illegal immigrants.
civics, naturalization, pew
425
2018-22-31
Wednesday, 31 January 2018 03:22 PM
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