Tags: NSA/Surveillance | Polls | apple | comey | encryption | google

53 Percent of US: Gov't Routinely Spies on Citizens

53 Percent of US: Gov't Routinely Spies on Citizens
(Edric De Jour/Dreamstime)

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Wednesday, 11 April 2018 05:56 PM Current | Bio | Archive

Fifty-three percent of American adults believe the federal government is engaged in widespread monitoring or spying on the activities of American citizens. According to the Monmouth University Polling Institute, another 29 percent believe such monitoring happens but is not widespread. Only 14 percent believe the government does not engage in such behavior.[1]

Just 18 percent believe such spying is usually justified. Twenty-eight percent say say it's never justified. Just over half (53 percent) believe it is sometimes justified. On a more personal basis, 53 percent worry that the government is invading their privacy.

That includes 23 percent who are very worried.

When it comes to government invading their own privacy, 29 percent of conservatives are very worried. So are 17 percent of liberals. Moderates (21 percent) and liberals (19 percent) are somewhat more likely than conservatives (12 percent) to believe that government spying is usually justified.

These results come at a time when, according to The Hill.com, the Trump administration and other government officials are seeking to make it easier for the government to access personal data on encrypted smartphones. The Hill.com states that "the issue has long been a source of tension between law enforcement and the tech community." [2]

Support among government officials for easier access to private data is widespread. In fact, even one of President Trump’s most public detractors — former FBI Director James Comey — agrees with the Trump administration on this topic. As I noted in "Politics Has Failed: America Will Not," Comey "was outraged that Apple and Google served their customers by keeping their smartphone information private, but he acknowledged the public demand for such protection: 'Encryption isn’t just a technical feature; it’s a marketing pitch.'"

  1. Monmouth University, "Public Troubled by 'Deep State,'" March 19, 2018
  2. The Hill, "New push to break deadlock over encrypted phones," April 8, 2018

Each weekday, Scott Rasmussen’s Number of the Day explores interesting and newsworthy topics at the intersection of culture, politics, and technology. Columns published on Ballotpedia reflect the views of the author.​

Each weekday, Scott Rasmussen’s Number of the Day explores interesting and newsworthy topics at the intersection of culture, politics, and technology. Columns published on Ballotpedia reflect the views of the author.? Scott Rasmussen is founder and president of the Rasmussen Media Group. He is the author of "Mad as Hell: How the Tea Party Movement Is Fundamentally Remaking Our Two-Party System," "In Search of Self-Governance," and "The People’s Money: How Voters Will Balance the Budget and Eliminate the Federal Debt." Read more reports from Scott Rasmussen — Click Here Now.

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Support among government officials for easier access to private data is widespread. In fact, even one of President Trump’s most public detractors, former FBI Director James Comey, agrees with the Trump administration on this topic.
apple, comey, encryption, google
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2018-56-11
Wednesday, 11 April 2018 05:56 PM
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