Tags: police | ShotSpotter | technology | gunfire | New York City

NYC Police Set to Launch Gunfire-Detecting Technology

By    |   Tuesday, 09 September 2014 03:01 PM

New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer has approved a two-year $1.5 million contract for a pilot project to deploy a technology to enable law enforcement to pinpoint and reduce gunfire, The Wall Street Journal reports.

Under the contract for the ShotSpotter Flex, the New York City Police Department will be able to cover up to five separate boroughs by 2015.

The tool instantly notifies officers of gunshot crimes in progress with real-time data. The data is sent to dispatch centers, patrol cars, and smartphones, with the aim of  improving police response times.

In addition, it can provide real-time access to maps of shooting locations, actionable intelligence detailing the number of shooters, and the number of shots fired, and has the capability of pinpointing precise locations that can assist police in searching for evidence and interviewing witnesses, according to SST, which makes the tool.

Urgent: Do You Support Obama’s Gun Control? Vote Now

William Bratton, New York City's police commissioner, joined the board of SST in April 2013.

The company announced it had experienced a 20 percent increase in client growth in the first four months of 2014.

In addition to New York City, ShotSpotter was deployed this year in Worcester, Massachusetts; Miami; South Bend, Indiana; Wilmington, Delaware; and Bayamon and Trujillo Alto in Puerto Rico.

The system was deployed in Washington, D.C., in 2006 and documented about 39,000 separate incidents of gunfire, according to an analysis by The Washington Post.

The reports of gunfire were twice the number of officially reported felony gun crimes. In 2009 alone, ShotSpotter captured more than 9,000 incidents of gunfire, the Post reported.

Other cities also have reported success after implementing the program.

"ShotSpotter has proven to be extremely useful in pinpointing the actual origin of gunshots in Boston, Springfield, and a number of other cities across the country," Cambridge, Massachusetts, Police Commissioner Robert C. Haas said in a statement announcing the city's implementation of the system in May.

According to The Boston Globe, the system was tested in Cambridge during a live-fire exercise in August.

"We anticipate that this will be just as valuable as a public safety tool for the Cambridge Police and help expedite our response in the event that there are gunshot incidents, which can result in potentially saving lives, increasing weapon-related arrests, and ultimately enhancing the safety of our neighborhoods," Haas said.

The Cambridge City Council filed its application for a grant with the Department of Homeland Security to implement the program four years ago, but it was only recently  approved.

Not all cities are rushing to embrace the technology. The Evansville, Indiana, City Council was divided over whether to approve a grant when it was considered in August, the Evansville Courier & Press reported.

Urgent: Do You Support Obama’s Gun Control? Vote Now

© 2020 Newsmax. All rights reserved.


   
1Like our page
2Share
US
New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer has approved a two-year $1.5 million contract for a pilot project to deploy a technology to enable law enforcement to pinpoint and reduce gunfire, The Wall Street Journal reports.
police, ShotSpotter, technology, gunfire, New York City
465
2014-01-09
Tuesday, 09 September 2014 03:01 PM
Newsmax Media, Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved