Tags: Coronavirus | genesisIIchurch | MMS | Genon

Court Bans Sale of 'Miracle Mineral Solution' Florida Church Claims Cures COVID-19

Court Bans Sale of 'Miracle Mineral Solution' Florida Church Claims Cures COVID-19
(Vetre Antanaviciute-meskauskiene | Dreamstime)

By    |   Tuesday, 21 April 2020 06:52 PM

A “miracle mineral solution” (MMS) peddled by a South Florida church and others as a cure for Coronavirus has come under legal fire from the US Food and Drug Administration.

The United States District Court for the Southern District of Florida issued a temporary injunction against a Bradenton, Fl., group called the Genesis II Church of Health and Healing and its operators Mark, Joseph, Jordan and Jonathan Grenon, forbidding them from selling “an unproven and potentially harmful treatment for Covid-19,” The Guardian reported.

MMS consists of sodium chlorite and citric acid which, when combined, produces chlorine dioxide, a type of bleach used in textile manufacturing.

However, the FDA last August released a statement urging Americans to not drink MMS, ten years after the FDA first warned that the mixture is ineffective and, in fact, dangerous.

“Drinking any of these chlorine dioxide products can cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and symptoms of severe dehydration,” the FDA warned, adding, “The FDA has received reports of consumers who have suffered from severe vomiting, severe diarrhea, life-threatening low blood pressure caused by dehydration and acute liver failure after drinking these products.”

Genesis II also claims that MMS, sold as a “sacramental kit,” is a cure for everything from cancer and AIDS to Alzheimer’s disease and multiple sclerosis.

Fiona O’Leary, who helped get MMS banned in Ireland in 2016, told The Guardian that the legal action is “long overdue. I’m delighted, and I hope it leads to a real prosecution. We need to see this in a criminal frame. The warnings alone don’t work.”

In fact, the injunction states that the FDA and the Federal Trade Commission warned the Florida group to stop promoting unsubstantiated claims about MMS but “defendants not only continue to sell MMS with claims that it cures, mitigates, treats, or prevents Coronavirus, which includes COVID-19, but they have also expressly stated that they will not take corrective action.”

US Attorney Ariana Fajardo Orshan of the Southern District of Florida stated, “We will zealously pursue perpetrators of fraud schemes seeking to take advantage of the COVID-19 pandemic.”

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A "miracle mineral solution" (MMS) peddled by a South Florida church and others as a cure for Coronavirus has come under legal fire from the US Food and Drug Administration....
genesisIIchurch, MMS, Genon
363
2020-52-21
Tuesday, 21 April 2020 06:52 PM
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