Tags: selfie | photography | danger

People Are Endangering Themselves to Take Pictures, Video

People Are Endangering Themselves to Take Pictures, Video
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Tuesday, 03 April 2018 09:30 AM Current | Bio | Archive

You may be surprised to learn — I certainly was — that there has been such a constant shutter click of selfie deaths that Wikipedia now has an entry devoted solely to selfie-taking injuries and deaths. In 2015 worldwide there were 27 “selfie related” deaths and remarkably enough almost half of the fatalities occurred in a single nation: India.

There is no corresponding entry for people killed while videotaping something other than themselves, although I’m sure it’s happened somewhere. Recently in Arcadia, California, we almost had a death or serious injury while making a video in the backyard.

CBS13 was right on top of the story. Homeowner George Hooper was making a movie of a bear cub that was eating acorns and playing in his family’s backyard. Hooper and company already knew the cub was living in the crawlspace under a neighbor’s home.

George couldn’t pass the opportunity when the cub arrived in his yard. He went out back and began taping, “It’s exciting, it’s thrilling and I’m watching him and thinking this is just amazing to have something so wild and so close.”

The “thrill” was shortly to escalate in intensity. What Hooper either didn’t know or didn’t consider was that bears — unlike humans — do not suffer from abandoned children syndrome. Bears may be plagued with deadbeat dads, but one can be certain that mom is always in the vicinity.

As Hooper relates, “We were watching the little one and then we came back inside and we saw the big one — the momma bear with the tag on the ear — and she came out [from under the neighbor’s house] to keep an eye on things. So now it’s a whole new ball game, isn’t it?” I’ll say!

(Where the neighbor was during all this commotion is not mentioned, nor do we ever learn if the neighbor was aware of his crawlspace being turned into an ursine condominium.)

Mrs. Bear was not entirely unfamiliar to the Hooper family, she had a tag in her ear and George thinks they may have seen momma in the neighborhood before. But they had not put two-and-two together and put momma with the baby.

George wisely rushed the family indoors, “The little one rushed back [under the house] when he saw me but I don’t want to upset that momma at all.”

Wise decision.

George called the police, who outsourced the call to the Humane Society. Its "expert" assessed the situation and decided, “Since it’s the bears’ natural habitat, the Humane Society has decided to leave the bears, for now.”

Although how a cub and its very protective and clawed mother, living under a human house smack dab in the middle of a human neighborhood is “natural habitat” I will leave it for you to decide.

Michael Reagan, the eldest son of President Reagan, is a Newsmax TV analyst. A syndicated columnist and author, he chairs The Reagan Legacy Foundation. Michael is an in-demand speaker with Premiere speaker’s bureau. Read more reports from Michael Reagan — Go Here Now.

Michael R. Shannon is a commentator, researcher for the League of American Voters, and an award-winning political and advertising consultant with nationwide and international experience. He is author of "Conservative Christian’s Guidebook for Living in Secular Times (Now with added humor!)." Read more of Michael Shannon's reports — Go Here Now.

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You may be surprised to learn — I certainly was — that there has been such a constant shutter click of selfie deaths that Wikipedia now has an entry devoted solely to selfie-taking injuries and deaths.
selfie, photography, danger
553
2018-30-03
Tuesday, 03 April 2018 09:30 AM
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