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Wayne Allyn Root: Risk and Win in Life's Ultimate Gamble

Thursday, 16 December 2004 12:00 AM

This earnest and engaging tome by the rags-to-riches Root is more Tony Robbins than Jimmy the Greek.

The man who advertises himself as “America’s premier sports gambler” is the first to admit in his candid self-portrait and guidebook that he has no quick-fix recipe on how to morph losers into winners (in life or gambling).

By way of example, in the closing to his chapter “A Complete Guide to Contrarian Sports Betting,” Root takes a breath and summarizes:

“[L]et’s review what we’ve learned.

Do these simple things, advises the maestro, and “you can expect to double your bankroll every 60 to 110 bets.”

“Easy for you to say, Mr. Ivy League-educated, good-looking, disciplined guy,” rhetorically retorts the cynical reader overwhelmed by the author’s detailed discussions of each of these lofty gambling virtues. (We chronic losers, by the way, consistently practice just the opposite of the Root guidelines.)

Ah, but that’s the author’s point: It wasn’t easy for Root to claw his way to success, and it won’t be easy for the reader seeking the best route to his own Shangri-La.

As he highlights in his frank book, Root’s own evolution into the devoutly praying, meditating, vitamin-popping, nature-walking, exercising, iron-pumping icon that he is today was no overnight success saga.

In some entertaining prose, he gives the reader a gander at his own sorry state of affairs – years ago, when he first made the commitment to stride out on the road less traveled.

The author’s father, once a fabled World War II navigator, had knuckled down to the humdrum life of a town butcher, slogging each day to the hated workplace. Dreams shattered, energy gone ...

Root’s personal pledge was to do the opposite of the father.

Once committed to the near-fantasy goal of becoming the nation’s most famous gambler and odds-maker, he never looked back.

Predictably, failure followed failure. Money was lost, borrowed again and lost again in self-promotion schemes. At one point his income was $50 a week.

Relatively safe way-stations in his stormy journey (like commentator on Financial News Network Sports) are tossed to the curb in favor of the next BIG stride forward to greater independence and a throwing off of the yoke of an employer’s paycheck.

Root’s flamboyant trip to the top seems almost to belie some of the gambling advice he proffers – pros know to quit and leave the casino when they are ahead.

But if there is a single kernel message in the compelling pages and paragraphs, it has to be: Take that risk. Talk to that beautiful woman. Leave that dead end job ...

Most of us card-carrying members of the “masses of asses” (Root’s word for losers that never break from the pack) lurking out there in the dark beyond the gleam of the lights twinkling down from Root’s enormous Vegas digs are, of course, afraid to death of RISK.

Root, however, does more than nurse the reader who is stoically mired in convention off the fear wagon. Yes – you guessed it – there is plenty of specific advice on betting strategies for those who want to soak up some tips and race off to their bookies to put it into practice.

For instance, in a chapter titled “History Meets Contrarian Strategy (Historical Trends, Theories, and Systems for Sports Gambling Success),” Root debunks team-specific trends, which uninitiated bettors too often rely upon:

“... I do not trust or utilize a trend that says the Dallas Cowboys are 10-0 on the road versus teams from the NFC Central. Or Dallas is 0-7 the last seven times they've played on a Friday.”

Indeed, such trends are “most probably a statistical fluke – pure, random chance,” Root instructs.

Root runs with his Contrarian principles through the minefields of betting on college football, basketball, baseball and even good old-fashioned poker.

He likens gambling with success in the business world and even the broader stage of world history:

“[M]any of the famous super-achievers in history were valiant risk-takers. They had to be willing to be Contrarian, to choose to challenge the masses, the critics, and the experts. They had to be willing to risk failure and humiliation. Now it’s your turn.”

“Your turn” might very well start by reading and taking to heart “The Zen of Gambling.”

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This earnest and engaging tome by the rags-to-riches Root is more Tony Robbins than Jimmy the Greek. The man who advertises himself as "America's premier sports gambler" is the first to admit in his candid self-portrait and guidebook that he has no quick-fix recipe on how...
Wayne,Allyn,Root:,Risk,and,Win,Life's,Ultimate,Gamble
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Thursday, 16 December 2004 12:00 AM
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