Tags: U.S. | Cities | Grew | Rapidly | Last | Decade

U.S. Cities Grew Rapidly in Last Decade

Monday, 07 May 2001 12:00 AM

Western and Southern cities, like Las Vegas and Charlotte, N.C., grew the fastest, fueled by booming economies and an influx of immigrants. Even as whites fled cities, they were replaced in many instances by immigrants, mainly Hispanics, as well as by young professionals and older adults with grown children.

"What all this says is that consumer preferences are important," said Edward L. Glaeser, an economics professor at Harvard University and a visiting fellow at the Brookings Institution who has studied urban demographics.

"City officials need to worry about what makes their city an attractive place to live in. They need to make streets safe and schools solid."

Reversing a 50-year trend, Chicago grew by 112,000 people. New York exceeded eight million people for the first time, its highest population ever. But Philadelphia and Detroit lost population.

Midwestern cities that lost population, like Detroit, fell at slower rates than in past decades. The overall population in Detroit dropped by 7.5 percent, but the number of whites fell by 53 percent to 100,000. The black middle class has been fleeing to the suburbs, too. And now, the city has only one movie theater, which opened last month.

"The city is not ready to admit that what's happening is that blacks with the wherewithal are leaving," said Kurt R. Metzger, an urban affairs expert at Wayne State University in Detroit. "A lot of the folks who are left are those who can't afford to leave."

Urban industrial centers in the Rust Belt like Cleveland and Pittsburgh and Middle Atlantic and Northeastern cities like Hartford and Baltimore generally declined as jobs and people migrated elsewhere.

Traffic jams correlate with growth, but not the way one might think, Glaeser said. Of the 28 cities that grew by more than 25 percent in the 1990's, an average of only 2.5 percent of the people in those cities used mass transit. But on average, the 11 cities where more than 20 percent of residents use subways and buses had flat growth. Of these cities, New York grew the fastest, at 9 percent.

"This makes public transportation a double-edged sword for cities," Glaeser said. "One the one hand, it takes care of poor residents, which is admirable. But on the other hand, it attracts the poor who create a host of urban problems."

Copyright 2001 by United Press International.

© 2019 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

   
1Like our page
2Share
Pre-2008
Western and Southern cities, like Las Vegas and Charlotte, N.C., grew the fastest, fueled by booming economies and an influx of immigrants. Even as whites fled cities, they were replaced in many instances by immigrants, mainly Hispanics, as well as by young professionals...
U.S.,Cities,Grew,Rapidly,Last,Decade
391
2001-00-07
Monday, 07 May 2001 12:00 AM
Newsmax Media, Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved