Tags: U.N. | Believes | U.S. | Dismantled | Iraq's | Nuke | Sites

U.N. Believes U.S. Dismantled Iraq's Nuke Sites

Wednesday, 13 October 2004 12:00 AM

Late Tuesday, the State Department issued a cryptic statement simply stating that the situation is "under control."

It would go no further.

Security Council members have remained curiously mum on the latest reports.

ElBaradei's warnings come on the heels of concerns over the disposition of chemical and biological materials expressed by Dimitri Perricos, the acting head of the U.N. Monitoring, Observation, Verification and Inspection Commission (UNMOVIC), the non-nuclear weapons inspectors.

While publicly mute, the IAEA and UNMOVIC privately believe the U.S. controlled "Iraq Survey Group" actually supervised the dismamtlement of Iraq's WMD weapons facilities and movement of its materials.

Such actions are a clear violation of Security Council resolutuions on Iraq.

The survey group, under control of the Central Intelligence Agency and led by former U.N. arms inspector Charles Duelfer, submitted a "comprehensive" report to the White House on Iraq's WMD that concluded most of Saddam's WMD and his weapons programs were either destroyed or mothballed at the time of Operation Iraqi Freedom (March 2003).

The IAEA and UNMOVIC misgivings have added to a deteriorating atmosphere in the region.

Iran and its nuclear activities have been the subject of recent conficts with the IAEA.

Tensions continue to escalate between Tehran, the IAEA and the Security Council on the mushrooming growth of its nuclear "power and research" programs.

The agency has expressed concerns that the Iranian program could have military applications.

Israel has threatened to bomb the Iranian facilities, as it did with Iraq in the early 80s.

Iran's foreign minister Kamal Kharazzi told NewsMax that any Israeli attacks "would be responded to most severely."

Coincidentally, Tehran recently conducted a successful launch of a new version of its Shehab missile.

The Shehab, a medium-range ballistic missile, is believed by U.S. intelligence to be nuclear capable and has the range to put of all of Israel within its sights.

Iranian diplomats tell NewsMax that while they take Israel's warnings seriously, they believe any potential attack would come from the U.S. and its allies.

Russia's foreign minister, Sergey Lavrov, recently admitted that Moscow "would oppose" any Security Council action against Tehran. As a permanent member, Russia could veto any Council intervnetion.

Moscow also has a muli-billion dollar contract to build two massive nuclear facilties for the Iranians.

The facilities, two power generating light-water reactors, are not believed to be capable of producing weapons.

Washington is trying to stall completion of the power stations because it believes they could still provide "training" and "expertise" in the handling of nuclear materials which could have military significance.

On Tuesday, Iran offered to halt any atomic weapons "research" if it was allowed to reprocess its spent fuel domestically.

Orginally, Moscow was contracted to "reprocess" any spent Iranian fuel. However price became an issue and Tehran scrapped that approach.

Published reports now claim that the U.S. and UK are considering "financial" incentives if Tehran gives up any fuel reprocessing which is critical to any potential bomb making.

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Late Tuesday, the State Department issued a cryptic statement simply stating that the situation is "under control." It would go no further. Security Council members have remained curiously mum on the latest reports. ElBaradei's warnings come on the heels of concerns...
U.N.,Believes,U.S.,Dismantled,Iraq's,Nuke,Sites
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2004-00-13
Wednesday, 13 October 2004 12:00 AM
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