Tags: Two | Men | Arrested | Dutch | Nuclear | Research | Reactor

Two Men Arrested at Dutch EC Nuclear Research Reactor Site

Friday, 28 September 2001 12:00 AM

The nuclear research unit's reactor is right next to the area where the two men were arrested. International experts on terrorism have long warned of the vulnerability of nuclear installations.

American researcher Prof. James D. Ballard of Grand Valley State University, for instance, produced a report in 1998 on the results of terrorist attacks against nuclear waste disposal and nuclear reactor sites. The assistant professor at the School of Criminal Justice in Allendale, Md., was asked to analyze the perceived results of any terrorist attack against the nuclear waste disposal units at the Yucca Mountain facility in Clark County, Nev.

However, his lucidly written scenario could apply equally to any other such facility worldwide. He wrote:

"The most discussed consequence of a nuclear waste transportation accident or terrorist incident is the potential adverse impact on the State and local economies. ... The Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects believes either an actual accident or the perceived risk of such an incident could create serious negative economic effects for Las Vegas, Clark County, and the State of Nevada. The Agency's annual report states:

"... that each one-percent decline for Clark County in spending by visitors, retired people, and investors relative to the baseline levels assumed to occur in some future year (e.g., 2010) could produce an annual loss of 7,000 jobs and $200 million in income. It is not clear how large a percentage decline could be expected as a result of repository-related perceptions, nor how long it would last, but corresponding cases involving risk-related declines in tourist spending indicate that such decline could be well in excess of the conservative one-percent illustrated here. Further research into analogous cases is planned to test these assumptions."

He also warned that in 1998, even the oldest existing armor-piercing material available in the world's armed forces was easily able to punch sizeable holes through the regular nuclear waste shipping containers and release its lethal contents into the atmosphere.

He urged that the engineering standards for shipping containers be redesigned so that they could not be destroyed nor pierced by such military armor-piercing ballistae. This advice was taken seriously and the U.S. established upgraded requirements for these containers. However, many nuclear shipments are still carried worldwide in the old armor-pierceable containers, even if they don't meet the Americans' more stringent safety requirements.

Only last month, the United States had still rejected the quality control standards being maintained by at least one major international nuclear shipments container manufacturer - and whose inexpensive products are still in worldwide use today - namely South Africa's NEC corporation's shipping containers for nuclear medical isotopes.

© 2019 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

   
1Like our page
2Share
Pre-2008
The nuclear research unit's reactor is right next to the area where the two men were arrested. International experts on terrorism have long warned of the vulnerability of nuclear installations. American researcher Prof. James D. Ballard of Grand Valley State University,...
Two,Men,Arrested,Dutch,Nuclear,Research,Reactor,Site
434
2001-00-28
Friday, 28 September 2001 12:00 AM
Newsmax Media, Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved