Tags: Summary | the | Day's | News

Summary of the Day's News

Monday, 17 September 2001 12:00 AM

The New York Stock Exchange reopened Monday with the Dow Jones index falling by 7 percent.

President Bush suggested prime terrorist suspect Osama bin Laden was wanted dead or alive.

U.S. officials have told UPI that in light of security concerns, the United Nations is likely to postpone the general debate for the opening of its 56th session. Washington has stressed the difficulty of providing security to world leaders for the scheduled opening Sept. 28.

UPI has learned Pakistan's ruling Gen. Pervez Musharraf agreed to cooperate with the American war on terrorism only as a matter of Pakistani national survival. Musharraf was warned by Pakistani political party leaders that they would fight against the United States if he cooperated with the Bush administration.

Secretary of State Colin Powell Monday denied reports that Washington had asked a Pakistani delegation to deliver an ultimatum to the Taliban for handing over Osama Bin-Laden.

On the first day of financial trading since the World Trade Center terror attacks, Mayor Rudolph Giuliani said Monday, "A lot of our city is getting back to normal." He said 5,422 people were missing and 201 bodies had been recovered.

The FBI is continuing to make arrests in the wake of last Tuesday's terror attacks, but officials declined to give details Monday, citing a court order. The agency questioned three people whom it said interfered with the flight crew of an American Airlines flight from Austin, Texas, to O'Hare International Airport. Meanwhile, the Treasury Department has created an interagency group devoted to scrutinize the funding of terrorist groups around the world.

Iranian President Mohammed Khatami urged U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan to put together a strategy for combating all kinds of terrorism, and warned against "hasty or emotional reactions" to the suicide attacks against New York and Washington.

The terrorist attacks have strengthened Washington's intention to proceed with building an anti-ballistic missile shield regardless of Russia's objections to a unilateral U.S. withdrawal from the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty, a top U.S. diplomat said Monday.

American Airlines said it is evaluating staffing as it works to rebuild service to 80 percent of the airline's capacity before last week's terrorist attacks. It was the only comment American made on a report earlier that one of its executives told pilots in a hot-line message Sunday they would not be immune from cutbacks similar to those announced Saturday at Continental.

Meanwhile, Virgin Atlantic Airways Monday became the latest airline to announce layoffs and flight reductions following the attacks. Continental Airlines said it will end service to 10 airports as part of its plan to reduce capacity by 20 percent systemwide. It also plans to furlough 12,000 employees.

Canadian leaders, including Prime Minister Jean Chretien, called Monday for a halt to the backlash against Arab and Muslim immigrants in the wake of last week's terrorist attacks in the United States.

National supermarket chains, retailers and discounters said most Americans appear to be heeding President Bush's call to return to normal life in the wake of Tuesday's terror attacks. Stores nationwide on Monday reported no widespread hoarding or panic buying.

Gasoline prices were largely flat Monday after a week in which pump prices surged and concerns about new hostilities in the Persian Gulf region grew after surprise terrorist attacks on the United States. The national average price for a gallon of gasoline Monday was pegged by AAA at $1.552, up a fraction of a cent from Sunday and about 2 cents below the price a year ago.

India will observe two minutes of silence today at 10:30 a.m. local time (1 p.m. EDT) as part of National Solidarity Day. The day is being observed to mourn the victims of the terrorist attacks in New York City and Washington last. The Delhi police will stop traffic for two minutes for the victims of the terrorist strikes.

The international press expressed qualified support Monday for U.S.-led retaliation against the terrorist group or groups responsible for last week's attacks, but many editorials warned President Bush against hasty or ill-considered action.

European Union leaders will hold a summit Friday in Brussels to review the international situation following last week's terrorist attacks in New York and Washington. Belgium, which holds the rotating EU presidency, announced the meeting and said it will bring together the heads of state and government of the 15 EU nations.

Copyright 2001 by United Press International.

All rights reserved.

© 2019 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

   
1Like our page
2Share
Pre-2008
The New York Stock Exchange reopened Monday with the Dow Jones index falling by 7 percent. President Bush suggested prime terrorist suspect Osama bin Laden was wanted dead or alive. U.S. officials have told UPI that in light of security concerns, the United Nations is...
Summary,the,Day's,News
732
2001-00-17
Monday, 17 September 2001 12:00 AM
Newsmax Media, Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved