Tags: Seeks | Identify | Held | Briton

UK Seeks To Identify Held Briton

Sunday, 13 January 2002 12:00 AM

A Foreign Office spokeswoman told United Press International that British authorities had been given details of the prisoners but could not yet confirm his identity or ethnic background.

U.S. authorities earlier said that 20 men flown to the Guantanamo Bay naval base on Friday were suspected of being members of Osama Bin Laden's al-Qaeda terrorist network and the former Taliban regime in Afghanistan.

Officials indicated that the next of kin of the detained man would be informed before details of his identity were released.

The British Broadcasting Corp. quoted government sources as saying the arrested man was not James McLintock, a 37-year-old Scot who was detained on Christmas Eve on Pakistan's border with Afghanistan. British officials later visited McLintock in Pakistani custody.

British officials not named in news reports said they would be seeking assurances that the Briton would be treated fairly during the detention period and the charges against him would be specified.

U.S. Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld said the men were not being treated as prisoners of war, but as "unlawful combatants." But he said the prisoners would be treated humanely and within the terms of the Geneva Convention.

Donald Anderson, a member of the ruling Labor Party in the British Parliament and chairman of the Commons Foreign Affairs Select Committee, told news media he believed the prisoners must be treated in a civilized way.

"Whatever the formal category, these prisoners still have legal rights and what we've heard already suggests that human rights are indeed being put in jeopardy," he said in a BBC radio interview.

The foreign affairs spokesman for the opposition Liberal Democrat Party, Menzies Campbell, said the men were "entitled to be dealt with humanely ... and should not be subject to degrading treatment."

He said, "Nothing is more likely to damage support for the campaign against terrorism, particularly in Arab countries, if these men are seen to be humiliated."

The 20 men transferred to Guantanamo Bay are the first of an expected 2,000 due for airlift and detention at the base.

Reports about British citizens fighting for the Taliban have circulated since the U.S.-led campaign began in Afghanistan last year, but none have been confirmed as yet by British government sources.

Copyright 2002 by United Press International.

All rights reserved.

© 2019 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

   
1Like our page
2Share
Pre-2008
A Foreign Office spokeswoman told United Press International that British authorities had been given details of the prisoners but could not yet confirm his identity or ethnic background. U.S. authorities earlier said that 20 men flown to the Guantanamo Bay naval base on...
Seeks,Identify,Held,Briton
377
2002-00-13
Sunday, 13 January 2002 12:00 AM
Newsmax Media, Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved