Tags: Polls | Against | Gore; | Says | They | Don't | Matter

Polls Go Against Gore; He Says They Don't Matter

Tuesday, 28 November 2000 12:00 AM

New polls that surfaced Tuesday show mainly partisan support for Bush and Gore – but also an increasing sentiment that Gore should not try to draw out the legal wrangling.

Gore dismissed a reporter's question about the survey Tuesday. Polls had also shown that he would lose the election but in the end he won the popular vote, he said. Only the courts, not the people's opinion, will decide the fate of Florida's ballots, he said.

"I'm quite sure that the polls don't matter in this because it is a legal question," Gore said.

According to a Gallup poll released Tuesday, 56 percent of Americans say Gore should concede the election to Bush, as opposed to 38 percent who say he should continue to fight.

And not only the margin is uncomfortable news for the vice president. Just last week the same poll was evenly divided – with 46 percent on either side of the issue – suggesting that support for his stream of lawsuits has dwindled since the certification of the Florida vote Sunday night.

A poll by liberal NBC News, also released Tuesday, said that 47 percent of Americans disapprove of Gore's post-election behavior, while only 41 percent disapprove of Bush's post-election behavior. Again, it is the trend as much as the bottom line that is bad news for the Democrat vice president. On Nov. 13, the same poll put the percentages at 38 and 36, respectively.

And, according to a Washington Post-ABC News poll, 60 percent of those interviewed want Gore to abandon his presidential bid now.

Democrats, so far, remain united behind Gore. Some Democrats said they would likely support Gore up until the Dec. 12 deadline for states to decide the fate of their electors before a Dec. 18 vote of the Electoral College.

House Minority Leader Richard Gephardt claimed on NBC's "Today" show that Democrats were maintaining solidarity.

"We do a conference call with Joe Lieberman or [Gore campaign chairman] Bill Daley about every other day. I talk to members all day long," Gephardt said.

"Members know that this is a razor-thin election. They want to be patient. They want, like their constituents, to get an accurate count, not just a fast count. We can surely wait the next 10 to 14 days to get this right so that we know actually who the people voted for."

Gore's running mate, Sen. Joe Lieberman of Connecticut, said on CBS's "Early Show" that Gore would not concede, for now.

"At this point, this is a matter of doing what we think is right, not just for us and the 50 million Americans who voted for us, but for our system, for history, to set a precedent. But we're very mindful of what's good for the country, and we certainly don't want this to go on for very long."

Gore said Tuesday that he was mindful of the timing issue. "I understand that this is a process that needs to be expeditious as well as fair," Gore told reporters at his residence.

Copyright 2000 by United Press International. All rights reserved.

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New polls that surfaced Tuesday show mainly partisan support for Bush and Gore – but also an increasing sentiment that Gore should not try to draw out the legal wrangling. Gore dismissed a reporter's question about the survey Tuesday. Polls had also shown that he...
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2000-00-28
Tuesday, 28 November 2000 12:00 AM
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