Tags: Nevada | Chosen | for | Nuclear | Waste

Nevada Chosen for Nuclear Waste

Thursday, 10 January 2002 12:00 AM

Democrat lawmakers and Nevada's congressional delegation immediately criticized the choice, even though it had been expected.

The energy industry has long pushed for a better means of disposing radioactive waste produced by nuclear power plants. It is stashed at more than 130 temporary sites scattered across 39 states - sites with inadequate security.

Not having an outlet for spent fuel, some warn, could force some nuclear plants to close.

"A repository is important to our energy security," U.S. Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham said in a letter to Nevada Gov. Kenny Guinn. "We must ensure that nuclear power, which provides 20 percent of the nation's electric power, remains an important part of our domestic energy production."

Abraham's recommendation will go to the White House within 30 days for Bush's approval.

Proponents of the single-site plan say something must be done with growing amounts of nuclear materials before they become an environmental disaster. Nuclear waste could also become a potential terrorist target.

"We should consolidate the nuclear wastes to enhance protection against terrorist attacks by moving them to one underground location that is far from population centers," Abraham said.

House Speaker Dennis Hastert, R-Ill., a supporter, said it's time to move the project beyond the study phase and "get something back on the billions of dollars invested over the years."

Despite the national security risk of having nuclear waste on hold at sites throughout the nation, Senate plurality leader Tom Daschle, D-S.D., called the decision "unfortunate and premature." He urged the Bush administration to hold off until roughly

"Before anyone starts shipping hundreds of tons of radioactive waste across America's highways and railways, the government needs to make sure it is taking the safest, wisest course," Daschle, a probable Democrat presidential contender for 2004, said in a statement. "There is no way anyone can know that today. The safety of the American people, not political pressure from the energy industry, should be the overriding concern."

Critics of the plan, including self-styled environmentalists and Nevada lawmakers, cringe at the possibility that potentially deadly radioactive refuse could be regularly moving along the state's highways and railroads. Supporters of the plan cringe at the possibility of nuclear waste being stolen from the low-security sites scattered around the country where it is currently stored.

Yucca Mountain is considered a promising location for nuclear waste because of its remote location northwest of Las Vegas, its desert climate and its hard volcanic rock composition. Copyright 2002 by United Press International.

All rights reserved.

© 2019 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

   
1Like our page
2Share
Pre-2008
Democrat lawmakers and Nevada's congressional delegation immediately criticized the choice, even though it had been expected. The energy industry has long pushed for a better means of disposing radioactive waste produced by nuclear power plants. It is stashed at more than...
Nevada,Chosen,for,Nuclear,Waste
415
2002-00-10
Thursday, 10 January 2002 12:00 AM
Newsmax Media, Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved