Tags: Merry | What?

Merry What?

Wednesday, 22 December 2004 12:00 AM

By so doing we have abetted the crass commercialization of this holy feast day, along the way teaching our children by our example that it's the gifts we give each other rather than the gift our Father in heaven gave us - His divine Son - that we celebrate.

We wallow in sentimentality, gushing platitudes, mouthing such meaningless phrases such as "peace on earth, good will to men," distorting the true angelic hymn which has real meaning: "Peace on earth

This is the reality of Christmas day: From the moment of his miraculous conception Jesus Christ was embarked on a death march toward Golgotha. It was what he came for - to suffer an excruciating passion and death to absolve sinners and open the gates of paradise for those who open their minds and hearts to him.

His passion and death were the final example of what he came to tell us - that the way to peace in this world and salvation in the next is total subservience to the will of the Father - "thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven," as he taught us to pray. He lived that message every minute of his life and died showing us to what extent it must be carried. "Father," he prayed in the garden of Gethsemani, "if it be your will let this cup pass from me, but not my will,

As St. Augustine prayed, "for you made us for yourself, and our hearts are restless until we rest in you."

We don't like to view the birth of Christ as a prelude to his suffering and death. We don't like to be reminded of what he really endured. Much of the criticism of Mel Gibson's "The Passion of the Christ" involved the fact that he confronted us with the whole shocking painful reality of Good Friday.

The fact that it required the Son of God to leave paradise, come and live among us and die a terrible death to free us from the consequences of our sinfulness should be a lesson about the very nature of sin and how deadly it is in the eyes of a loving God. Sin is placing our will above God's, children defying their father, whose only concern is their welfare, and in the case of God, abandoning their ultimate hope of unity with Him.

Christmas day should be an opportunity for us to reflect on the fact that Jesus was born expressly for the purpose of suffering and dying for us. It should be the time to say thank you to the Father for giving his son to us, and to his son for giving himself to us.

That's the meaning of Christmas.

Merry Christmas.

Phil Brennan is a veteran journalist who writes for NewsMax.com. He is editor & publisher of Wednesday on the Web (http://www.pvbr.com) and was Washington columnist for National Review magazine in the 1960s. He also served as a staff aide for the House Republican Policy Committee and helped handle the Washington public relations operation for the Alaska Statehood Committee which won statehood for Alaska. He is also a trustee of the Lincoln Heritage Institute and a member of the Association of Former Intelligence Officers.

He can be reached at phil@newsmax.com

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By so doing we have abetted the crass commercialization of this holy feast day, along the way teaching our children by our example that it's the gifts we give each other rather than the gift our Father in heaven gave us - His divine Son - that we celebrate. We wallow in...
Merry,What?
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2004-00-22
Wednesday, 22 December 2004 12:00 AM
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