Tags: Mass. | Ill. | Out | Restrict | Firearms

Mass., Ill. Out to Restrict Firearms

Wednesday, 13 April 2005 12:00 AM

The Mass. enactment, if passed, would require that on or after January 1, 2007, any manufacturer or wholesaler of firearms or rifles that ships, transports or delivers a firearm or rifle to any person in the commonwealth "shall include in the container with the firearm or rifle a separate sealed container that encloses a projectile discharged from such firearm or rifle; or a shell casing of a bullet or projectile discharged from the firearm," according to the language of the bill.

Under the proposed law, a gunsmith or dealer in firearms would be required within ten days of the receipt of any firearm or rifle from a manufacturer that fails to comply with the provisions to return the firearm or rifle to the manufacturer or wholesaler, or to notify the department of state police of the noncompliance and obtain a substitute sealed container through participation in a program operated by the commonwealth.

Upon receipt of a projectile and sealed container, the State Police or Boston Police Department would further be required to enter in "an automated electronic databank pertinent data and other ballistic information relevant to the identification of the projectile and shell casing and to the firearm or rifle from which they were discharged."

Those violating the new rules would be punished by imprisonment from between two and five years

Meanwhile, under the proposed Illinois bill, gun owners would have 90 days to outright surrender their semi-automatic firearms to the police, or face felony prosecution and stiff jail sentences.

The dramatic gun control measure currently making its way to the floor of the Illinois House immediately earned the ire of the Illinois State Rifle Association, which condemned the House bill as "unfair, ineffective, and divisive legislation that targets law-abiding citizens for prosecution while ignoring the dangerous repeat-offenders who are responsible for the bulk of violent crimes committed in Illinois."

"HB 2414 is a public policy nightmare," commented ISRA Executive Director Richard Pearson. "Overnight, the bill would create an entirely new class of criminals.

"I think it would be conservative to say that at least half of the gun owners in Illinois own firearms that would be banned under this bill. The result would be that more than 750,000 citizens, few of whom ever even contemplated committing a crime, would be instantly branded as ‘criminals' by the mere stroke of the Governor's pen."

"Since the firearms banned by HB 2414 cost between $800 and $4,000 apiece, many owners have a sizeable investment at stake here," added Pearson.

"It's a safe bet that they are not pleased with the prospect of handing their valuable gun collections over to the local police and going home empty handed," Pearson continued.

"HB 2414 is a clear attempt by some members of the General Assembly to punish law-abiding gun owners," concluded Pearson. "There is no connection between the provisions within HB 2414 and the common street thug. . ."

Proponents of the bill, however, reprise the argument that once highlighted the national debate on semi-automatic or so-called "assault" weapons – such arms have no legitimate role in hunting or target shooting sport.

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The Mass. enactment, if passed, would require that on or after January 1, 2007, any manufacturer or wholesaler of firearms or rifles that ships, transports or delivers a firearm or rifle to any person in the commonwealth "shall include in the container with the firearm or...
Mass.,,Ill.,Out,Restrict,Firearms
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2005-00-13
Wednesday, 13 April 2005 12:00 AM
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