Tags: Librarians | Subjected | Porn

Librarians Subjected to Porn

Wednesday, 30 May 2001 12:00 AM

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission last week announced a finding of probable cause that the librarians' rights were violated, reported Robert S. Halagan, an attorney representing the librarians.

Halagan said the ruling was an important victory. "The fact that an independent agency has determined that the library's conduct was unlawful should cause the library to take a more realistic view of the case."

The librarians complained that hard-core pornography was left visible on library Internet terminals, graphic printouts were left on tables and youngsters and library staff were exposed to images of bestiality and child rape.

Patrons complained that anyone walking through the library could see pornography on computers.

"They were exposed not only to sexually graphic material and the most explicit stuff that's out there on the Web, but also to child pornography and material that is clearly unlawful and illegal - and the library chose not to take action to address that situation," Halagan said.

In addition to allowing unlimited access to this material, the library had a policy that anybody could print anything he wanted off the Internet.

"They could access the material and then print off free of charge all the pictures they wanted, including material that is banned from their shelves," Halagan said.

Family groups applauded the EEOC's decision.

"Our hats are off to the 'Minneapolis 12,'" said Jan LaRue, director of legal studies with Family Research Council and an expert in pornography and Internet legislation.

"The EEOC's decision is both legally correct and amply justified," LaRue said in a statement.

Few libraries have used blocking technologies on computers because of the policies and pressure of American Library Association, LaRue said.

ALA promotes unrestricted access by anyone, regardless of age, to all materials available on the Internet, including obscenity, she added.

ALA and American Civil Liberties Union oppose filters, which they say are ineffective and a violation of First Amendment rights to free speech.

Library leaders apologized after the complaint and revised their Internet policy, limiting computer use to 30 minutes and requiring users to show identification.

The EEOC invited the librarians and the library system to join in trying to resolve their dispute. An attempt at mediation failed after the complaint was filed 12 months ago.

Halagan said the librarians were prepared to file a lawsuit if further talks failed. "If we can't reach an acceptable resolution then it will go to litigation either with the Justice Department or with individuals proceeding independently."

A librarian in Chicago has filed a complaint with that city on similar grounds, Family Research Council said.

Copyright

© 2019 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

   
1Like our page
2Share
Pre-2008
The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission last week announced a finding of probable cause that the librarians' rights were violated, reported Robert S. Halagan, an attorney representing the librarians. Halagan said the ruling was an important victory. The fact that an...
Librarians,Subjected,Porn
428
2001-00-30
Wednesday, 30 May 2001 12:00 AM
Newsmax Media, Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved