Tags: Level-headed | Response

Level-headed Response

Tuesday, 11 September 2001 12:00 AM

We would do well to remember and guard against the power-grabbing fiasco that began but two weeks after the Oklahoma City bombing, under the leadership of President William Jefferson Clinton, when he unveiled the 118-page Omnibus Counterterrorism Act of 1995 (S. 390 in the Senate and H.R. 896 in the House) and its 18-page Anti-terrorism Amendments Act as an addendum.

It was on May 3 of that year that the president sent the act to Congress for its "immediate consideration and enactment." The pressure was applied to, in essence, act now and think later. Mr. Clinton assured Congress that the bill would "provide an effective and comprehensive response to the threat of terrorism, while also protecting our precious civil liberties." White House deputy chief of staff Harold Ickes stood by the president's assurance: "This president is well familiar with the Constitution. He has taught constitutional law and he is very concerned that whatever is submitted conform to the Constitution."

No doubt, Mr. Clinton knew all about the Constitution, for this act did so much in the way of intentional subversion. A few of its major problems:

As for its call to nullify posse comitatus guidelines, Feingold called it "a dangerous precedent, as well as one of the most dangerous departures from the protection of civilian law enforcement in this history of our country."

There was also peripheral damage, lest we forget. Clinton blamed the right for the bombing and initiated a campaign against conservative talk radio, with a solution, in part, of regulation of free speech on radio and a reversal of the Fairness Doctrine, a reversal which would have been the death knell to conservative talk radio.

Crisis, war, criminal behavior, emotionally charged events present moments of temptation for presidents. Appearing on MTV's "Enough is Enough" Forum on April 19, 1994, Mr. Clinton offered the most candid glimpse of his totalitarian philosophy:

Bibliography

William Norman Grigg. "Liberty Under Law." The New American, June 12, 1995.

William F. Jasper. "Battling Terrorism With Tyranny." The New American, May 29, 1995.

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We would do well to remember and guard against the power-grabbing fiasco that began but two weeks after the Oklahoma City bombing, under the leadership of President William Jefferson Clinton, when he unveiled the 118-page Omnibus Counterterrorism Act of 1995 (S. 390 in...
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2001-00-11
Tuesday, 11 September 2001 12:00 AM
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