Tags: Katrina | Act | Starring | Bush

Katrina, Act II - Starring Bush

Wednesday, 14 September 2005 12:00 AM

The low job approval of Bush's efforts in the week after the storm will fade into history and take its place alongside similar criticism of his slowness to act after the planes hit on Sept. 11 or after the tsunami struck late last year. What counts for the future is that the ratings on his recent performance are 20 points higher than his overall job approval.

This positive affirmation of the president's role in the past few weeks is the leading indicator Washington should be following. While all current polls show Bush falling three or four points in job approval to the lowest of his administration, these surveys reflect neither the increasingly positive view of the president's disaster-relief efforts nor the bounce that he always gets when we are reminded of the horrendous attacks of Sept. 11 on its grim anniversary.

Democrats, such as Sen. Hillary Clinton (D-N.Y.), who are assuming a harsh critical role in attacking the administration, are making a huge mistake. They are presenting an image of partisanship and rancor at a time when the nation wants its political leaders to spread healing balm and work together on reconstruction.

The stories of the rapidity with which the Federal Emergency Management Agency is bringing in mobile homes and building temporary housing, the bonding that seems to be happening between evacuees and their new communities, the record outpouring of charitable giving - greater even than after Sept. 11 or the tsunami - all attest to the national mood. If there is one time voters will be impatient with critics and those who they feel are raking over the past to score political points, it is now.

That is not to say that voters will not demand a fair, impartial and thorough review of what went wrong in the relief efforts and of why hospital patients died awaiting evacuation. They will be particularly interested in why federal money that should have gone to strengthening the levees went to other pork-barrel projects that Louisiana's senators wanted to be funded instead. The 9/11 Commission model should be followed to be certain we get the whole picture.

But now Americans want us to face the need not just to recover from the storm but to deal with the underlying poverty it exposed. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice put it best when she said that the storm-devastated areas should not be rebuilt the way they were when the storm hit. Rather, she said that "maybe now on the heels of New Orleans" we could "deal with the problem of persistent poverty."

Michael Harrington, in his book "The Other America," awakened our national consciousness to the "invisible poor" who live in our cities. Katrina has blown away the veil that kept them from sight and put their plight on all of our television screens. So now we have an opportunity and an obligation to remedy it.

In this task of relief, recovery and reconstruction, Bush has a job that will occupy most of his second term; and will lend it a theme and a grandeur that Sept. 11 imparted to his first four years in office.

© 2019 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

   
1Like our page
2Share
Pre-2008
The low job approval of Bush's efforts in the week after the storm will fade into history and take its place alongside similar criticism of his slowness to act after the planes hit on Sept. 11 or after the tsunami struck late last year. What counts for the future is that...
Katrina,,Act,Starring,Bush
521
2005-00-14
Wednesday, 14 September 2005 12:00 AM
Newsmax Media, Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved