Tags: Insider | Report: | Lieberman | Out | Hillary | Backs | Kerry

Insider Report: Lieberman Out, Hillary Backs Kerry

Wednesday, 04 February 2004 12:00 AM

Headlines (Scroll down for complete stories):
1. What Lieberman’s Exit Means
2. Hillary Backs Kerry
3. Ricin Attacks, More Bio Attacks Likely
4. Hollywood’s ‘Help’ Hurts Democrats
5. N.Y. Times Leaves Staff Defenseless
6. Regulation by Litigation

1. What Lieberman's Exit Means

Unable even to garner a small win in Delaware, the big news out of Tuesday's primaries is that Sen. Joe Lieberman has dropped out of the Democrats' presidential race.

The rejection of Lieberman, the only centrist in the race for the nomination, indicates how far the party is moving away from middle American voters.

It's already clear from the results so far:

Sen. John Kerry is the Democrats' presumptive nominee.

  • Sen. John Edwards secures a solid claim as the VP nominee.

  • Howard Dean and Wesley Clark are finished.

  • Efforts by the DNC to bring major African American endorsements in South Carolina to undermine Al Sharpton worked. We reported this would be a major behind-the-scenes effort, and Sharpton's influence will be greatly curtailed with his poor showing in South Carolina. Still, Democrats need to treat the Rev. Al with kid gloves. The maverick could endorse Bush if the Democrats treat him too shabbily.

  • Once again Zogby's polls were right on. Pollster John Zogby's tracking polls carefully reported Edwards' surge in the hotly contested South Carolina race. NewsMax readers can get exclusive polling data on the 2004 election as the race between Bush and Kerry heats up.

    Click Here to get the Zogby-NewsMax Confidential Report.

    2. Hillary Backs Kerry

    More signs that Wesley Clark's run is history: We hear Sen. Hillary Clinton is privately throwing her support to Sen. Kerry.

    A NewsMax friend recently saw her at a Washington dinner party. She indicated that Kerry was clearly the best choice of the Democrats' field.

    When our friend suggested that a brokered convention still could happen, with Hillary emerging as the party's savior, she greeted the suggestion with a hearty laugh.

    3. Ricin Attacks, More Bio Attacks Likely

    As tests confirm Washington has been with deadly ricin attacks, NewsMax's new Financial Intelligence Report warned in its most recent edition that top experts believed a wave of biological attacks against the U.S. were expected. That report turned out to be dead on.

    Find out more about this report, and how to protect your investments if major biological weapons like anthrax or smallpox are deployed against the U.S.

    Click Here for the details.

    4. Hollywood's 'Help' Hurts Democrats

    A recent string of strange remarks on everything from abortion to terrorism isn't the only reason Wesley Clark's candidacy has waned. The greatest harm has come from a certain Hollywood chum who pretends to still live in Flint, Mich., but who actually luxuriates in plush digs in Manhattan.

    "Clark learned the meaning of desertion when voters turned away after filmmaker Michael Moore called the president a 'deserter,'" USA Today notes. The retired general's failure to denounce the false claim puzzled and disturbed voters.

    In fact, the newspaper reports: "Say goodbye to Hollywood. New Hampshire voters didn't let Tinseltown sway them. Kerry got the votes even though everyone else got the stars: Ted Danson and Mary Steenburgen for Clark; Glenn Close for Edwards; Martin Sheen for Dean."

    Pew Research Center reported this month that fewer than 20 percent of voters were swayed by endorsements from political figures.

    "Entertainers have even less clout," the Detroit Free Press reported.

    We're not a bit surprised that Americans don't want ill-informed actors telling them what to think and how to vote. Nobody outside La-La Land needs a script to tell him what's what.

    President Bush and Karl Rove must be hoping the Tinseltown tyros crank up the hate speech and repel even more voters from the Democrats.

    5. N.Y. Times Leaves Staff Defenseless

    Remember our report a few weeks ago about how the elitists of the New York Times were outraged that some employees in Iraq were packing heat to defend themselves from the terrorists? Now the Old Gray Lady has made good on its threats and has disarmed its own people, the Wall Street Journal reported Friday.

    By the way, 13 journalists were killed in Iraq last year, and two CNN employees were gunned down near Baghdad last week. Expect the body count to rise.

    6. Regulation by Litigation

    Tobacco was just the start. Now they want to put to death the diesel engine.

    "In recent years, federal regulators have found an alternative to traditional regulation by rule-making or regulation by negotiation: regulation by litigation," says The Lighthouse, the weekly e-mail newsletter of Independent Institute, a public-policy research organization.

    This costly tactic is a favorite of envirocrats.

    "The Environmental Protection Agency, for example, sued heavy-duty diesel engine manufacturers in an effort to get the industry to scuttle technology it had developed to conform to previous EPA dictates....

    "Although litigation by regulation has lowered regulatory costs for the EPA, it has raised costs significantly to the diesel engine industry - with the added cost of uncertainty to the industry probably far exceeding the amount of penalties imposed by courts or through settlements, according to a study by economists Bruce Yandle and Andrew P. Morriss, published in the winter issue of The Independent Review.

    "Diesel engine makers settled the suit at a cost of $1 billion, but that outcome did not necessarily translate into a cleaner air, Yandle and Morris argue."

    109

  • Sen. John Edwards secures a solid claim as the VP nominee.

  • Howard Dean and Wesley Clark are finished.

  • Efforts by the DNC to bring major African American endorsements in South Carolina to undermine Al Sharpton worked. We reported this would be a major behind-the-scenes effort, and Sharpton's influence will be greatly curtailed with his poor showing in South Carolina. Still, Democrats need to treat the Rev. Al with kid gloves. The maverick could endorse Bush if the Democrats treat him too shabbily.

  • Once again Zogby's polls were right on. Pollster John Zogby's tracking polls carefully reported Edwards' surge in the hotly contested South Carolina race. NewsMax readers can get exclusive polling data on the 2004 election as the race between Bush and Kerry heats up.

    Click Here to get the Zogby-NewsMax Confidential Report.

    2. Hillary Backs Kerry

    More signs that Wesley Clark's run is history: We hear Sen. Hillary Clinton is privately throwing her support to Sen. Kerry.

    A NewsMax friend recently saw her at a Washington dinner party. She indicated that Kerry was clearly the best choice of the Democrats' field.

    When our friend suggested that a brokered convention still could happen, with Hillary emerging as the party's savior, she greeted the suggestion with a hearty laugh.

    3. Ricin Attacks, More Bio Attacks Likely

    As tests confirm Washington has been with deadly ricin attacks, NewsMax's new Financial Intelligence Report warned in its most recent edition that top experts believed a wave of biological attacks against the U.S. were expected. That report turned out to be dead on.

    Find out more about this report, and how to protect your investments if major biological weapons like anthrax or smallpox are deployed against the U.S.

    Click Here for the details.

    4. Hollywood's 'Help' Hurts Democrats

    A recent string of strange remarks on everything from abortion to terrorism isn't the only reason Wesley Clark's candidacy has waned. The greatest harm has come from a certain Hollywood chum who pretends to still live in Flint, Mich., but who actually luxuriates in plush digs in Manhattan.

    "Clark learned the meaning of desertion when voters turned away after filmmaker Michael Moore called the president a 'deserter,'" USA Today notes. The retired general's failure to denounce the false claim puzzled and disturbed voters.

    In fact, the newspaper reports: "Say goodbye to Hollywood. New Hampshire voters didn't let Tinseltown sway them. Kerry got the votes even though everyone else got the stars: Ted Danson and Mary Steenburgen for Clark; Glenn Close for Edwards; Martin Sheen for Dean."

    Pew Research Center reported this month that fewer than 20 percent of voters were swayed by endorsements from political figures.

    "Entertainers have even less clout," the Detroit Free Press reported.

    We're not a bit surprised that Americans don't want ill-informed actors telling them what to think and how to vote. Nobody outside La-La Land needs a script to tell him what's what.

    President Bush and Karl Rove must be hoping the Tinseltown tyros crank up the hate speech and repel even more voters from the Democrats.

    5. N.Y. Times Leaves Staff Defenseless

    Remember our report a few weeks ago about how the elitists of the New York Times were outraged that some employees in Iraq were packing heat to defend themselves from the terrorists? Now the Old Gray Lady has made good on its threats and has disarmed its own people, the Wall Street Journal reported Friday.

    By the way, 13 journalists were killed in Iraq last year, and two CNN employees were gunned down near Baghdad last week. Expect the body count to rise.

    6. Regulation by Litigation

    Tobacco was just the start. Now they want to put to death the diesel engine.

    "In recent years, federal regulators have found an alternative to traditional regulation by rule-making or regulation by negotiation: regulation by litigation," says The Lighthouse, the weekly e-mail newsletter of Independent Institute, a public-policy research organization.

    This costly tactic is a favorite of envirocrats.

    "The Environmental Protection Agency, for example, sued heavy-duty diesel engine manufacturers in an effort to get the industry to scuttle technology it had developed to conform to previous EPA dictates....

    "Although litigation by regulation has lowered regulatory costs for the EPA, it has raised costs significantly to the diesel engine industry - with the added cost of uncertainty to the industry probably far exceeding the amount of penalties imposed by courts or through settlements, according to a study by economists Bruce Yandle and Andrew P. Morriss, published in the winter issue of The Independent Review.

    "Diesel engine makers settled the suit at a cost of $1 billion, but that outcome did not necessarily translate into a cleaner air, Yandle and Morris argue."

    109

  • Howard Dean and Wesley Clark are finished.

  • Efforts by the DNC to bring major African American endorsements in South Carolina to undermine Al Sharpton worked. We reported this would be a major behind-the-scenes effort, and Sharpton's influence will be greatly curtailed with his poor showing in South Carolina. Still, Democrats need to treat the Rev. Al with kid gloves. The maverick could endorse Bush if the Democrats treat him too shabbily.

  • Once again Zogby's polls were right on. Pollster John Zogby's tracking polls carefully reported Edwards' surge in the hotly contested South Carolina race. NewsMax readers can get exclusive polling data on the 2004 election as the race between Bush and Kerry heats up.

    Click Here to get the Zogby-NewsMax Confidential Report.

    2. Hillary Backs Kerry

    More signs that Wesley Clark's run is history: We hear Sen. Hillary Clinton is privately throwing her support to Sen. Kerry.

    A NewsMax friend recently saw her at a Washington dinner party. She indicated that Kerry was clearly the best choice of the Democrats' field.

    When our friend suggested that a brokered convention still could happen, with Hillary emerging as the party's savior, she greeted the suggestion with a hearty laugh.

    3. Ricin Attacks, More Bio Attacks Likely

    As tests confirm Washington has been with deadly ricin attacks, NewsMax's new Financial Intelligence Report warned in its most recent edition that top experts believed a wave of biological attacks against the U.S. were expected. That report turned out to be dead on.

    Find out more about this report, and how to protect your investments if major biological weapons like anthrax or smallpox are deployed against the U.S.

    Click Here for the details.

    4. Hollywood's 'Help' Hurts Democrats

    A recent string of strange remarks on everything from abortion to terrorism isn't the only reason Wesley Clark's candidacy has waned. The greatest harm has come from a certain Hollywood chum who pretends to still live in Flint, Mich., but who actually luxuriates in plush digs in Manhattan.

    "Clark learned the meaning of desertion when voters turned away after filmmaker Michael Moore called the president a 'deserter,'" USA Today notes. The retired general's failure to denounce the false claim puzzled and disturbed voters.

    In fact, the newspaper reports: "Say goodbye to Hollywood. New Hampshire voters didn't let Tinseltown sway them. Kerry got the votes even though everyone else got the stars: Ted Danson and Mary Steenburgen for Clark; Glenn Close for Edwards; Martin Sheen for Dean."

    Pew Research Center reported this month that fewer than 20 percent of voters were swayed by endorsements from political figures.

    "Entertainers have even less clout," the Detroit Free Press reported.

    We're not a bit surprised that Americans don't want ill-informed actors telling them what to think and how to vote. Nobody outside La-La Land needs a script to tell him what's what.

    President Bush and Karl Rove must be hoping the Tinseltown tyros crank up the hate speech and repel even more voters from the Democrats.

    5. N.Y. Times Leaves Staff Defenseless

    Remember our report a few weeks ago about how the elitists of the New York Times were outraged that some employees in Iraq were packing heat to defend themselves from the terrorists? Now the Old Gray Lady has made good on its threats and has disarmed its own people, the Wall Street Journal reported Friday.

    By the way, 13 journalists were killed in Iraq last year, and two CNN employees were gunned down near Baghdad last week. Expect the body count to rise.

    6. Regulation by Litigation

    Tobacco was just the start. Now they want to put to death the diesel engine.

    "In recent years, federal regulators have found an alternative to traditional regulation by rule-making or regulation by negotiation: regulation by litigation," says The Lighthouse, the weekly e-mail newsletter of Independent Institute, a public-policy research organization.

    This costly tactic is a favorite of envirocrats.

    "The Environmental Protection Agency, for example, sued heavy-duty diesel engine manufacturers in an effort to get the industry to scuttle technology it had developed to conform to previous EPA dictates....

    "Although litigation by regulation has lowered regulatory costs for the EPA, it has raised costs significantly to the diesel engine industry - with the added cost of uncertainty to the industry probably far exceeding the amount of penalties imposed by courts or through settlements, according to a study by economists Bruce Yandle and Andrew P. Morriss, published in the winter issue of The Independent Review.

    "Diesel engine makers settled the suit at a cost of $1 billion, but that outcome did not necessarily translate into a cleaner air, Yandle and Morris argue."

    109

  • Efforts by the DNC to bring major African American endorsements in South Carolina to undermine Al Sharpton worked. We reported this would be a major behind-the-scenes effort, and Sharpton's influence will be greatly curtailed with his poor showing in South Carolina. Still, Democrats need to treat the Rev. Al with kid gloves. The maverick could endorse Bush if the Democrats treat him too shabbily.

  • Once again Zogby's polls were right on. Pollster John Zogby's tracking polls carefully reported Edwards' surge in the hotly contested South Carolina race. NewsMax readers can get exclusive polling data on the 2004 election as the race between Bush and Kerry heats up.

    Click Here to get the Zogby-NewsMax Confidential Report.

    2. Hillary Backs Kerry

    More signs that Wesley Clark's run is history: We hear Sen. Hillary Clinton is privately throwing her support to Sen. Kerry.

    A NewsMax friend recently saw her at a Washington dinner party. She indicated that Kerry was clearly the best choice of the Democrats' field.

    When our friend suggested that a brokered convention still could happen, with Hillary emerging as the party's savior, she greeted the suggestion with a hearty laugh.

    3. Ricin Attacks, More Bio Attacks Likely

    As tests confirm Washington has been with deadly ricin attacks, NewsMax's new Financial Intelligence Report warned in its most recent edition that top experts believed a wave of biological attacks against the U.S. were expected. That report turned out to be dead on.

    Find out more about this report, and how to protect your investments if major biological weapons like anthrax or smallpox are deployed against the U.S.

    Click Here for the details.

    4. Hollywood's 'Help' Hurts Democrats

    A recent string of strange remarks on everything from abortion to terrorism isn't the only reason Wesley Clark's candidacy has waned. The greatest harm has come from a certain Hollywood chum who pretends to still live in Flint, Mich., but who actually luxuriates in plush digs in Manhattan.

    "Clark learned the meaning of desertion when voters turned away after filmmaker Michael Moore called the president a 'deserter,'" USA Today notes. The retired general's failure to denounce the false claim puzzled and disturbed voters.

    In fact, the newspaper reports: "Say goodbye to Hollywood. New Hampshire voters didn't let Tinseltown sway them. Kerry got the votes even though everyone else got the stars: Ted Danson and Mary Steenburgen for Clark; Glenn Close for Edwards; Martin Sheen for Dean."

    Pew Research Center reported this month that fewer than 20 percent of voters were swayed by endorsements from political figures.

    "Entertainers have even less clout," the Detroit Free Press reported.

    We're not a bit surprised that Americans don't want ill-informed actors telling them what to think and how to vote. Nobody outside La-La Land needs a script to tell him what's what.

    President Bush and Karl Rove must be hoping the Tinseltown tyros crank up the hate speech and repel even more voters from the Democrats.

    5. N.Y. Times Leaves Staff Defenseless

    Remember our report a few weeks ago about how the elitists of the New York Times were outraged that some employees in Iraq were packing heat to defend themselves from the terrorists? Now the Old Gray Lady has made good on its threats and has disarmed its own people, the Wall Street Journal reported Friday.

    By the way, 13 journalists were killed in Iraq last year, and two CNN employees were gunned down near Baghdad last week. Expect the body count to rise.

    6. Regulation by Litigation

    Tobacco was just the start. Now they want to put to death the diesel engine.

    "In recent years, federal regulators have found an alternative to traditional regulation by rule-making or regulation by negotiation: regulation by litigation," says The Lighthouse, the weekly e-mail newsletter of Independent Institute, a public-policy research organization.

    This costly tactic is a favorite of envirocrats.

    "The Environmental Protection Agency, for example, sued heavy-duty diesel engine manufacturers in an effort to get the industry to scuttle technology it had developed to conform to previous EPA dictates....

    "Although litigation by regulation has lowered regulatory costs for the EPA, it has raised costs significantly to the diesel engine industry - with the added cost of uncertainty to the industry probably far exceeding the amount of penalties imposed by courts or through settlements, according to a study by economists Bruce Yandle and Andrew P. Morriss, published in the winter issue of The Independent Review.

    "Diesel engine makers settled the suit at a cost of $1 billion, but that outcome did not necessarily translate into a cleaner air, Yandle and Morris argue."

    109

  • Once again Zogby's polls were right on. Pollster John Zogby's tracking polls carefully reported Edwards' surge in the hotly contested South Carolina race. NewsMax readers can get exclusive polling data on the 2004 election as the race between Bush and Kerry heats up.

    Click Here to get the Zogby-NewsMax Confidential Report.

    2. Hillary Backs Kerry

    More signs that Wesley Clark's run is history: We hear Sen. Hillary Clinton is privately throwing her support to Sen. Kerry.

    A NewsMax friend recently saw her at a Washington dinner party. She indicated that Kerry was clearly the best choice of the Democrats' field.

    When our friend suggested that a brokered convention still could happen, with Hillary emerging as the party's savior, she greeted the suggestion with a hearty laugh.

    3. Ricin Attacks, More Bio Attacks Likely

    As tests confirm Washington has been with deadly ricin attacks, NewsMax's new Financial Intelligence Report warned in its most recent edition that top experts believed a wave of biological attacks against the U.S. were expected. That report turned out to be dead on.

    Find out more about this report, and how to protect your investments if major biological weapons like anthrax or smallpox are deployed against the U.S.

    Click Here for the details.

    4. Hollywood's 'Help' Hurts Democrats

    A recent string of strange remarks on everything from abortion to terrorism isn't the only reason Wesley Clark's candidacy has waned. The greatest harm has come from a certain Hollywood chum who pretends to still live in Flint, Mich., but who actually luxuriates in plush digs in Manhattan.

    "Clark learned the meaning of desertion when voters turned away after filmmaker Michael Moore called the president a 'deserter,'" USA Today notes. The retired general's failure to denounce the false claim puzzled and disturbed voters.

    In fact, the newspaper reports: "Say goodbye to Hollywood. New Hampshire voters didn't let Tinseltown sway them. Kerry got the votes even though everyone else got the stars: Ted Danson and Mary Steenburgen for Clark; Glenn Close for Edwards; Martin Sheen for Dean."

    Pew Research Center reported this month that fewer than 20 percent of voters were swayed by endorsements from political figures.

    "Entertainers have even less clout," the Detroit Free Press reported.

    We're not a bit surprised that Americans don't want ill-informed actors telling them what to think and how to vote. Nobody outside La-La Land needs a script to tell him what's what.

    President Bush and Karl Rove must be hoping the Tinseltown tyros crank up the hate speech and repel even more voters from the Democrats.

    5. N.Y. Times Leaves Staff Defenseless

    Remember our report a few weeks ago about how the elitists of the New York Times were outraged that some employees in Iraq were packing heat to defend themselves from the terrorists? Now the Old Gray Lady has made good on its threats and has disarmed its own people, the Wall Street Journal reported Friday.

    By the way, 13 journalists were killed in Iraq last year, and two CNN employees were gunned down near Baghdad last week. Expect the body count to rise.

    6. Regulation by Litigation

    Tobacco was just the start. Now they want to put to death the diesel engine.

    "In recent years, federal regulators have found an alternative to traditional regulation by rule-making or regulation by negotiation: regulation by litigation," says The Lighthouse, the weekly e-mail newsletter of Independent Institute, a public-policy research organization.

    This costly tactic is a favorite of envirocrats.

    "The Environmental Protection Agency, for example, sued heavy-duty diesel engine manufacturers in an effort to get the industry to scuttle technology it had developed to conform to previous EPA dictates....

    "Although litigation by regulation has lowered regulatory costs for the EPA, it has raised costs significantly to the diesel engine industry - with the added cost of uncertainty to the industry probably far exceeding the amount of penalties imposed by courts or through settlements, according to a study by economists Bruce Yandle and Andrew P. Morriss, published in the winter issue of The Independent Review.

    "Diesel engine makers settled the suit at a cost of $1 billion, but that outcome did not necessarily translate into a cleaner air, Yandle and Morris argue."

    109

    Click Here

    2. Hillary Backs Kerry

    More signs that Wesley Clark's run is history: We hear Sen. Hillary Clinton is privately throwing her support to Sen. Kerry.

    A NewsMax friend recently saw her at a Washington dinner party. She indicated that Kerry was clearly the best choice of the Democrats' field.

    When our friend suggested that a brokered convention still could happen, with Hillary emerging as the party's savior, she greeted the suggestion with a hearty laugh.

    3. Ricin Attacks, More Bio Attacks Likely

    As tests confirm Washington has been with deadly ricin attacks, NewsMax's new Financial Intelligence Report warned in its most recent edition that top experts believed a wave of biological attacks against the U.S. were expected. That report turned out to be dead on.

    Find out more about this report, and how to protect your investments if major biological weapons like anthrax or smallpox are deployed against the U.S.

    Click Here

    4. Hollywood's 'Help' Hurts Democrats

    A recent string of strange remarks on everything from abortion to terrorism isn't the only reason Wesley Clark's candidacy has waned. The greatest harm has come from a certain Hollywood chum who pretends to still live in Flint, Mich., but who actually luxuriates in plush digs in Manhattan.

    "Clark learned the meaning of desertion when voters turned away after filmmaker Michael Moore called the president a 'deserter,'" USA Today notes. The retired general's failure to denounce the false claim puzzled and disturbed voters.

    In fact, the newspaper reports: "Say goodbye to Hollywood. New Hampshire voters didn't let Tinseltown sway them. Kerry got the votes even though everyone else got the stars: Ted Danson and Mary Steenburgen for Clark; Glenn Close for Edwards; Martin Sheen for Dean."

    Pew Research Center reported this month that fewer than 20 percent of voters were swayed by endorsements from political figures.

    "Entertainers have even less clout," the Detroit Free Press reported.

    We're not a bit surprised that Americans don't want ill-informed actors telling them what to think and how to vote. Nobody outside La-La Land needs a script to tell him what's what.

    President Bush and Karl Rove must be hoping the Tinseltown tyros crank up the hate speech and repel even more voters from the Democrats.

    5. N.Y. Times Leaves Staff Defenseless

    Remember our report a few weeks ago about how the elitists of the New York Times were outraged that some employees in Iraq were packing heat to defend themselves from the terrorists? Now the Old Gray Lady has made good on its threats and has disarmed its own people, the Wall Street Journal reported Friday.

    By the way, 13 journalists were killed in Iraq last year, and two CNN employees were gunned down near Baghdad last week. Expect the body count to rise.

    6. Regulation by Litigation

    Tobacco was just the start. Now they want to put to death the diesel engine.

    "In recent years, federal regulators have found an alternative to traditional regulation by rule-making or regulation by negotiation: regulation by litigation," says The Lighthouse, the weekly e-mail newsletter of Independent Institute, a public-policy research organization.

    This costly tactic is a favorite of envirocrats.

    "The Environmental Protection Agency, for example, sued heavy-duty diesel engine manufacturers in an effort to get the industry to scuttle technology it had developed to conform to previous EPA dictates....

    "Although litigation by regulation has lowered regulatory costs for the EPA, it has raised costs significantly to the diesel engine industry - with the added cost of uncertainty to the industry probably far exceeding the amount of penalties imposed by courts or through settlements, according to a study by economists Bruce Yandle and Andrew P. Morriss, published in the winter issue of The Independent Review.

    "Diesel engine makers settled the suit at a cost of $1 billion, but that outcome did not necessarily translate into a cleaner air, Yandle and Morris argue."

    109

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    Headlines (Scroll down for complete stories):1. What Lieberman's Exit Means 2. Hillary Backs Kerry 3. Ricin Attacks, More Bio Attacks Likely 4. Hollywood's 'Help' Hurts Democrats 5. N.Y. Times Leaves Staff Defenseless 6. Regulation by Litigation1. What Lieberman's Exit...
    Insider,Report:,Lieberman,Out,,Hillary,Backs,Kerry
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    2004-00-04
    Wednesday, 04 February 2004 12:00 AM
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