Tags: Insider | Report: | George | Bush | Angers | Conservatives

Insider Report: George W. Bush Angers Conservatives

Sunday, 08 February 2004 12:00 AM

Headlines (Scroll down for complete stories):
1. George W. Bush Angers Conservatives
2. Why Libya Came Clean on WMD
3. Statue of Liberty 'Ceded to al-Qaeda'
4. N.Y. Times Pouts as U.S. Adds Jobs
5. China Claims Korea Too

1. George W. Bush Angers Conservatives

Howard Dean isn't the only presidential candidate suffering a self-inflicted meltdown. There's a certain Republican with the same problem, and we don't mean Wesley Clark the former Reaganite.

President Bush has so angered his conservative base by spending more than any Democrat in history and pandering to illegal aliens that Republican congressmen, stunned by constituents' complaints, met privately with Karl Rove to unload, the Washington Times revealed Friday.

"I would say 97 out of 100 of our members who asked questions laid into him pretty good about spending and the lack of discipline on the administration's part," said Rep. Tom Feeney, R-Fla.

The White House, however, does not seem to be taking the problem seriously. Presidential spokesman Trent Duffy said Bush wanted "to broaden the party."

Good luck with that sorry strategy. Those who try to be all things to all people end up standing for nothing and having nothing. Proof of this tactic's failure: The more money Bush squanders, the Democrats attack him.

Wall Street Journal columnist John Harwood notes that Bush is getting socked from the right and the left and has only himself to blame.

Harwood traces the recent plunge in Bush's popularity to four events:

The uproar caused by former Treasury secretary Paul O'Neill undermined Bush's biggest asset: his image as "a strong leader, with capable advisers, who talks straight."

  • The State of the Union speech deepened misgivings on Capitol Hill. Bush blamed the GOP-controlled Congress for his own massive spending and deficits, and angered Democrats when he "improbably suggested that he had been vindicated" on what he now calls "weapons-of-mass-destruction-related program activities."

  • After insisting his humongous expansion of Medicare would cost $400 billion over a decade, he jacked up the estimate to $540 billion. Democrats, of course, say the program should be even more gargantuan, and conservatives don't want it at all.

  • The latest insult: a record deficit of $521 billion this year in a $2.4 trillion budget that pleases no one. This from a man who said "we can proceed with tax relief without fear of budget deficits."

    Most damning of all is a statistic the Journal published recently. Bush increased domestic discretionary spending by a record 8.2 percent, compared to 2.5 percent for Bill Clinton, 2 percent for Jimmy Carter and 4.3 percent for Lyndon Johnson.

    Harwood notes that "just as with the nose-diving candidacy of Howard Dean, the problem is largely self-inflicted."

    2. Why Libya Came Clean on WMD

    When Libya came clean and opened up its country for international inspections relating to its weapons of mass destruction program, the decision was greeted in the U.S. with some euphoria and relief.

    Not only had a rogue state capitulated to the U.S. in its war on terror without a shot being fired, it offered vindication to the Bush administration.

    The U.S. discovered that Libya was very close to building a nuclear bomb. Much closer than Saddam's Iraq had been.

    But Khadafy's new attitude to the U.S. may not be so much appeasement on his part, but pure survival thinking.

    Sources in Washington tell NewsMax that one major factor in Libya's new thinking is that the Libyans believe that a weapon of mass destruction will be detonated on the U.S. homeland in the near future.

    The move by Libya to open up their weapons program sites was simple preventative thinking.

    "The Libyans wanted to wash their hands first," one source said. Such a move would relieve them of blame if a WMD is used in the U.S. Presumably, Libya did not want to be on the short list of rogue states the U.S. might retaliate against.

    3. Statue of Liberty 'Ceded to al-Qaeda'

    It sounds like the latest thriller from Hollywood: terrorists taking over the Statue of Liberty. But in a way this has already happened.

    If, like us, you've wanted for decades to climb to the crown of the nation's most beloved monument and take in the view of New York Harbor, tough luck. The statue has been closed since 9/11 and might never reopen.

    The National Park Service says it will probably reopen the pedestal this year but might never again allow access to the crown because of "security and safety issues" it won't define, USA Today noted.

    "Keep the people out and you will turn the statue into an international symbol of craven fear," the New York Daily News fumed. The landmark will have been "ceded to al-Qaeda."

    New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg said that as long as the statue remained closed, "in some sense, the terrorists have already won." This phrase is often overused, but this time it's being used correctly.

    Concerned? Contact the NPS, the White House and your congressman and senators.

    4. N.Y. Times Pouts as U.S. Adds Jobs

    It's not just the Democrats who keep trying to talk down America's economy. So are their media allies.

    The U.S. had another good piece of economic news Friday with the decline of the unemployment rate to 5.6 percent and the creation of 112,000 jobs.

    So what was the lead headline on the Web site of the New York Times? "U.S. Adds Fewer New Jobs Than Expected."

    5. Now China Claims Korea Too

    First communist Beijing seized the independent nation of Tibet. For years it has been scheming to take over the independent nation of Taiwan. Now it insists it owns much of Korea.

    The dictatorship-run Chinese Institute of Social Sciences has unleashed an "academic study" that shocked North and South Korean scholars by claiming the ancient Korean kingdom of Goguryeo, which extends south of Seoul, is an ethnic Han Chinese kingdom, the Washington Post and China Reform Monitor reported.

    "The Chinese are trying to use a novel claim on history as an insurance policy for the future of its border with Korea," said South Korean historian Yeo Ho Kyu.

    "This is not the first time the Chinese have tried to do this. They did the same thing before they claimed Tibet. Now they are trying to use history as a weapon to wield influence in an area that is historically Korean."

    Hmm. Maybe those South Korean students will think twice before rioting in protest of the U.S. troops who defend them at the American taxpayers' expense.

    And watch out, Japan. The Chinese might soon get revenge for all those atrocities perpetrated before and during World War II.

    109

  • The State of the Union speech deepened misgivings on Capitol Hill. Bush blamed the GOP-controlled Congress for his own massive spending and deficits, and angered Democrats when he "improbably suggested that he had been vindicated" on what he now calls "weapons-of-mass-destruction-related program activities."

  • After insisting his humongous expansion of Medicare would cost $400 billion over a decade, he jacked up the estimate to $540 billion. Democrats, of course, say the program should be even more gargantuan, and conservatives don't want it at all.

  • The latest insult: a record deficit of $521 billion this year in a $2.4 trillion budget that pleases no one. This from a man who said "we can proceed with tax relief without fear of budget deficits."

    Most damning of all is a statistic the Journal published recently. Bush increased domestic discretionary spending by a record 8.2 percent, compared to 2.5 percent for Bill Clinton, 2 percent for Jimmy Carter and 4.3 percent for Lyndon Johnson.

    Harwood notes that "just as with the nose-diving candidacy of Howard Dean, the problem is largely self-inflicted."

    2. Why Libya Came Clean on WMD

    When Libya came clean and opened up its country for international inspections relating to its weapons of mass destruction program, the decision was greeted in the U.S. with some euphoria and relief.

    Not only had a rogue state capitulated to the U.S. in its war on terror without a shot being fired, it offered vindication to the Bush administration.

    The U.S. discovered that Libya was very close to building a nuclear bomb. Much closer than Saddam's Iraq had been.

    But Khadafy's new attitude to the U.S. may not be so much appeasement on his part, but pure survival thinking.

    Sources in Washington tell NewsMax that one major factor in Libya's new thinking is that the Libyans believe that a weapon of mass destruction will be detonated on the U.S. homeland in the near future.

    The move by Libya to open up their weapons program sites was simple preventative thinking.

    "The Libyans wanted to wash their hands first," one source said. Such a move would relieve them of blame if a WMD is used in the U.S. Presumably, Libya did not want to be on the short list of rogue states the U.S. might retaliate against.

    3. Statue of Liberty 'Ceded to al-Qaeda'

    It sounds like the latest thriller from Hollywood: terrorists taking over the Statue of Liberty. But in a way this has already happened.

    If, like us, you've wanted for decades to climb to the crown of the nation's most beloved monument and take in the view of New York Harbor, tough luck. The statue has been closed since 9/11 and might never reopen.

    The National Park Service says it will probably reopen the pedestal this year but might never again allow access to the crown because of "security and safety issues" it won't define, USA Today noted.

    "Keep the people out and you will turn the statue into an international symbol of craven fear," the New York Daily News fumed. The landmark will have been "ceded to al-Qaeda."

    New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg said that as long as the statue remained closed, "in some sense, the terrorists have already won." This phrase is often overused, but this time it's being used correctly.

    Concerned? Contact the NPS, the White House and your congressman and senators.

    4. N.Y. Times Pouts as U.S. Adds Jobs

    It's not just the Democrats who keep trying to talk down America's economy. So are their media allies.

    The U.S. had another good piece of economic news Friday with the decline of the unemployment rate to 5.6 percent and the creation of 112,000 jobs.

    So what was the lead headline on the Web site of the New York Times? "U.S. Adds Fewer New Jobs Than Expected."

    5. Now China Claims Korea Too

    First communist Beijing seized the independent nation of Tibet. For years it has been scheming to take over the independent nation of Taiwan. Now it insists it owns much of Korea.

    The dictatorship-run Chinese Institute of Social Sciences has unleashed an "academic study" that shocked North and South Korean scholars by claiming the ancient Korean kingdom of Goguryeo, which extends south of Seoul, is an ethnic Han Chinese kingdom, the Washington Post and China Reform Monitor reported.

    "The Chinese are trying to use a novel claim on history as an insurance policy for the future of its border with Korea," said South Korean historian Yeo Ho Kyu.

    "This is not the first time the Chinese have tried to do this. They did the same thing before they claimed Tibet. Now they are trying to use history as a weapon to wield influence in an area that is historically Korean."

    Hmm. Maybe those South Korean students will think twice before rioting in protest of the U.S. troops who defend them at the American taxpayers' expense.

    And watch out, Japan. The Chinese might soon get revenge for all those atrocities perpetrated before and during World War II.

    109

  • After insisting his humongous expansion of Medicare would cost $400 billion over a decade, he jacked up the estimate to $540 billion. Democrats, of course, say the program should be even more gargantuan, and conservatives don't want it at all.

  • The latest insult: a record deficit of $521 billion this year in a $2.4 trillion budget that pleases no one. This from a man who said "we can proceed with tax relief without fear of budget deficits."

    Most damning of all is a statistic the Journal published recently. Bush increased domestic discretionary spending by a record 8.2 percent, compared to 2.5 percent for Bill Clinton, 2 percent for Jimmy Carter and 4.3 percent for Lyndon Johnson.

    Harwood notes that "just as with the nose-diving candidacy of Howard Dean, the problem is largely self-inflicted."

    2. Why Libya Came Clean on WMD

    When Libya came clean and opened up its country for international inspections relating to its weapons of mass destruction program, the decision was greeted in the U.S. with some euphoria and relief.

    Not only had a rogue state capitulated to the U.S. in its war on terror without a shot being fired, it offered vindication to the Bush administration.

    The U.S. discovered that Libya was very close to building a nuclear bomb. Much closer than Saddam's Iraq had been.

    But Khadafy's new attitude to the U.S. may not be so much appeasement on his part, but pure survival thinking.

    Sources in Washington tell NewsMax that one major factor in Libya's new thinking is that the Libyans believe that a weapon of mass destruction will be detonated on the U.S. homeland in the near future.

    The move by Libya to open up their weapons program sites was simple preventative thinking.

    "The Libyans wanted to wash their hands first," one source said. Such a move would relieve them of blame if a WMD is used in the U.S. Presumably, Libya did not want to be on the short list of rogue states the U.S. might retaliate against.

    3. Statue of Liberty 'Ceded to al-Qaeda'

    It sounds like the latest thriller from Hollywood: terrorists taking over the Statue of Liberty. But in a way this has already happened.

    If, like us, you've wanted for decades to climb to the crown of the nation's most beloved monument and take in the view of New York Harbor, tough luck. The statue has been closed since 9/11 and might never reopen.

    The National Park Service says it will probably reopen the pedestal this year but might never again allow access to the crown because of "security and safety issues" it won't define, USA Today noted.

    "Keep the people out and you will turn the statue into an international symbol of craven fear," the New York Daily News fumed. The landmark will have been "ceded to al-Qaeda."

    New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg said that as long as the statue remained closed, "in some sense, the terrorists have already won." This phrase is often overused, but this time it's being used correctly.

    Concerned? Contact the NPS, the White House and your congressman and senators.

    4. N.Y. Times Pouts as U.S. Adds Jobs

    It's not just the Democrats who keep trying to talk down America's economy. So are their media allies.

    The U.S. had another good piece of economic news Friday with the decline of the unemployment rate to 5.6 percent and the creation of 112,000 jobs.

    So what was the lead headline on the Web site of the New York Times? "U.S. Adds Fewer New Jobs Than Expected."

    5. Now China Claims Korea Too

    First communist Beijing seized the independent nation of Tibet. For years it has been scheming to take over the independent nation of Taiwan. Now it insists it owns much of Korea.

    The dictatorship-run Chinese Institute of Social Sciences has unleashed an "academic study" that shocked North and South Korean scholars by claiming the ancient Korean kingdom of Goguryeo, which extends south of Seoul, is an ethnic Han Chinese kingdom, the Washington Post and China Reform Monitor reported.

    "The Chinese are trying to use a novel claim on history as an insurance policy for the future of its border with Korea," said South Korean historian Yeo Ho Kyu.

    "This is not the first time the Chinese have tried to do this. They did the same thing before they claimed Tibet. Now they are trying to use history as a weapon to wield influence in an area that is historically Korean."

    Hmm. Maybe those South Korean students will think twice before rioting in protest of the U.S. troops who defend them at the American taxpayers' expense.

    And watch out, Japan. The Chinese might soon get revenge for all those atrocities perpetrated before and during World War II.

    109

  • The latest insult: a record deficit of $521 billion this year in a $2.4 trillion budget that pleases no one. This from a man who said "we can proceed with tax relief without fear of budget deficits."

    Most damning of all is a statistic the Journal published recently. Bush increased domestic discretionary spending by a record 8.2 percent, compared to 2.5 percent for Bill Clinton, 2 percent for Jimmy Carter and 4.3 percent for Lyndon Johnson.

    Harwood notes that "just as with the nose-diving candidacy of Howard Dean, the problem is largely self-inflicted."

    2. Why Libya Came Clean on WMD

    When Libya came clean and opened up its country for international inspections relating to its weapons of mass destruction program, the decision was greeted in the U.S. with some euphoria and relief.

    Not only had a rogue state capitulated to the U.S. in its war on terror without a shot being fired, it offered vindication to the Bush administration.

    The U.S. discovered that Libya was very close to building a nuclear bomb. Much closer than Saddam's Iraq had been.

    But Khadafy's new attitude to the U.S. may not be so much appeasement on his part, but pure survival thinking.

    Sources in Washington tell NewsMax that one major factor in Libya's new thinking is that the Libyans believe that a weapon of mass destruction will be detonated on the U.S. homeland in the near future.

    The move by Libya to open up their weapons program sites was simple preventative thinking.

    "The Libyans wanted to wash their hands first," one source said. Such a move would relieve them of blame if a WMD is used in the U.S. Presumably, Libya did not want to be on the short list of rogue states the U.S. might retaliate against.

    3. Statue of Liberty 'Ceded to al-Qaeda'

    It sounds like the latest thriller from Hollywood: terrorists taking over the Statue of Liberty. But in a way this has already happened.

    If, like us, you've wanted for decades to climb to the crown of the nation's most beloved monument and take in the view of New York Harbor, tough luck. The statue has been closed since 9/11 and might never reopen.

    The National Park Service says it will probably reopen the pedestal this year but might never again allow access to the crown because of "security and safety issues" it won't define, USA Today noted.

    "Keep the people out and you will turn the statue into an international symbol of craven fear," the New York Daily News fumed. The landmark will have been "ceded to al-Qaeda."

    New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg said that as long as the statue remained closed, "in some sense, the terrorists have already won." This phrase is often overused, but this time it's being used correctly.

    Concerned? Contact the NPS, the White House and your congressman and senators.

    4. N.Y. Times Pouts as U.S. Adds Jobs

    It's not just the Democrats who keep trying to talk down America's economy. So are their media allies.

    The U.S. had another good piece of economic news Friday with the decline of the unemployment rate to 5.6 percent and the creation of 112,000 jobs.

    So what was the lead headline on the Web site of the New York Times? "U.S. Adds Fewer New Jobs Than Expected."

    5. Now China Claims Korea Too

    First communist Beijing seized the independent nation of Tibet. For years it has been scheming to take over the independent nation of Taiwan. Now it insists it owns much of Korea.

    The dictatorship-run Chinese Institute of Social Sciences has unleashed an "academic study" that shocked North and South Korean scholars by claiming the ancient Korean kingdom of Goguryeo, which extends south of Seoul, is an ethnic Han Chinese kingdom, the Washington Post and China Reform Monitor reported.

    "The Chinese are trying to use a novel claim on history as an insurance policy for the future of its border with Korea," said South Korean historian Yeo Ho Kyu.

    "This is not the first time the Chinese have tried to do this. They did the same thing before they claimed Tibet. Now they are trying to use history as a weapon to wield influence in an area that is historically Korean."

    Hmm. Maybe those South Korean students will think twice before rioting in protest of the U.S. troops who defend them at the American taxpayers' expense.

    And watch out, Japan. The Chinese might soon get revenge for all those atrocities perpetrated before and during World War II.

    109

    Most damning of all is a statistic the Journal published recently. Bush increased domestic discretionary spending by a record 8.2 percent, compared to 2.5 percent for Bill Clinton, 2 percent for Jimmy Carter and 4.3 percent for Lyndon Johnson.

    Harwood notes that "just as with the nose-diving candidacy of Howard Dean, the problem is largely self-inflicted."

    2. Why Libya Came Clean on WMD

    When Libya came clean and opened up its country for international inspections relating to its weapons of mass destruction program, the decision was greeted in the U.S. with some euphoria and relief.

    Not only had a rogue state capitulated to the U.S. in its war on terror without a shot being fired, it offered vindication to the Bush administration.

    The U.S. discovered that Libya was very close to building a nuclear bomb. Much closer than Saddam's Iraq had been.

    But Khadafy's new attitude to the U.S. may not be so much appeasement on his part, but pure survival thinking.

    Sources in Washington tell NewsMax that one major factor in Libya's new thinking is that the Libyans believe that a weapon of mass destruction will be detonated on the U.S. homeland in the near future.

    The move by Libya to open up their weapons program sites was simple preventative thinking.

    "The Libyans wanted to wash their hands first," one source said. Such a move would relieve them of blame if a WMD is used in the U.S. Presumably, Libya did not want to be on the short list of rogue states the U.S. might retaliate against.

    3. Statue of Liberty 'Ceded to al-Qaeda'

    It sounds like the latest thriller from Hollywood: terrorists taking over the Statue of Liberty. But in a way this has already happened.

    If, like us, you've wanted for decades to climb to the crown of the nation's most beloved monument and take in the view of New York Harbor, tough luck. The statue has been closed since 9/11 and might never reopen.

    The National Park Service says it will probably reopen the pedestal this year but might never again allow access to the crown because of "security and safety issues" it won't define, USA Today noted.

    "Keep the people out and you will turn the statue into an international symbol of craven fear," the New York Daily News fumed. The landmark will have been "ceded to al-Qaeda."

    New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg said that as long as the statue remained closed, "in some sense, the terrorists have already won." This phrase is often overused, but this time it's being used correctly.

    Concerned? Contact the NPS, the White House and your congressman and senators.

    4. N.Y. Times Pouts as U.S. Adds Jobs

    It's not just the Democrats who keep trying to talk down America's economy. So are their media allies.

    The U.S. had another good piece of economic news Friday with the decline of the unemployment rate to 5.6 percent and the creation of 112,000 jobs.

    So what was the lead headline on the Web site of the New York Times? "U.S. Adds Fewer New Jobs Than Expected."

    5. Now China Claims Korea Too

    First communist Beijing seized the independent nation of Tibet. For years it has been scheming to take over the independent nation of Taiwan. Now it insists it owns much of Korea.

    The dictatorship-run Chinese Institute of Social Sciences has unleashed an "academic study" that shocked North and South Korean scholars by claiming the ancient Korean kingdom of Goguryeo, which extends south of Seoul, is an ethnic Han Chinese kingdom, the Washington Post and China Reform Monitor reported.

    "The Chinese are trying to use a novel claim on history as an insurance policy for the future of its border with Korea," said South Korean historian Yeo Ho Kyu.

    "This is not the first time the Chinese have tried to do this. They did the same thing before they claimed Tibet. Now they are trying to use history as a weapon to wield influence in an area that is historically Korean."

    Hmm. Maybe those South Korean students will think twice before rioting in protest of the U.S. troops who defend them at the American taxpayers' expense.

    And watch out, Japan. The Chinese might soon get revenge for all those atrocities perpetrated before and during World War II.

    109

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    Headlines (Scroll down for complete stories):1. George W. Bush Angers Conservatives 2. Why Libya Came Clean on WMD 3. Statue of Liberty 'Ceded to al-Qaeda' 4. N.Y. Times Pouts as U.S. Adds Jobs 5. China Claims Korea Too1. George W. Bush Angers ConservativesHoward Dean...
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