Tags: Independent | Third | Candidate | American | Politics

An Independent Third Candidate in American Politics

Monday, 12 September 2005 12:00 AM

1992: A President George Bush in the White House, coming out of the first Gulf War with extraordinary public support and an approval rating of 91 percent.

Economic slowdown soon ensued. Political 'stalemate' overtook Capitol Hill. Pat Buchanan stung the president in New Hampshire and subsequent primaries.

Bill Clinton, despite pot and draft problems and Gennifer Flowers, zoomed to the front in the Democratic primaries.

Larry King and Ross Perot soon began their dance on CNN.

By the spring of 1992, with Bush and Clinton clearly about to secure their own parties' nominations, Ross Perot

What happened after that point is clear: Perot did

Seeing that he might actually win the presidency, Perot wigged out: He offered a crazy excuse - that CIA agents had infiltrated his daughter's wedding - and promptly dropped out of the race on the very day Bill Clinton gave his nomination speech at New York's Madison Square Garden.

Clinton vaulted from third to first place and never again trailed in the race against then-President George Bush.

(Yes, Perot later re-entered the race - undoubtedly missing all the attention. But his once-in-a-lifetime chance to be the first truly independent president since George Washington had passed him by.)

Now, 13 years later, we may again be entering a time in our political life when a truly independent third candidate (not necessarily an entirely new third party) could win the White House.

How?

A number of factors need to be present:

In the next column on this subject, the possible agenda for this candidate will be sketched out and a profile of the type of person who could pull off this near-impossible political feat will be described.

But one thing to consider: Hurricane Katrina has exposed serious problems. Not just with our disaster relief capability, but the fact that the two parties immediately began playing the blame game instead of worrying about the suffering people in Mississippi and Louisiana.

This type of political bickering is

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1992: A President George Bush in the White House, coming out of the first Gulf War with extraordinary public support and an approval rating of 91 percent. Economic slowdown soon ensued. Political 'stalemate' overtook Capitol Hill. Pat Buchanan stung the president in...
Independent,Third,Candidate,American,Politics
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2005-00-12
Monday, 12 September 2005 12:00 AM
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