Tags: Immigration's | Nifong | Moment

Immigration's Nifong Moment

Monday, 25 June 2007 12:00 AM

"It takes many good deeds to build a good reputation, and only one bad one to lose it," said Benjamin Franklin.

Disgraced, disbarred, and now former Durham County prosecutor Mike Nifong can relate to this. Nifong attempted to falsely prosecute three Duke University lacrosse players in the rape of a black stripper in 2006. The notorious case had everything an ambitious political con artist could ask for: sex, the misdeeds of supposedly privileged young white men, and the potential jackpot associated with racial bullying.

The was only one problem — the facts were not on Nifong's side.

Not one to let facts get in his way, Nifong would bluster, mislead, and distort in an attempt to put the Duke boys away for 30 years.

When it was discovered that Nifong did not turn over DNA evidence to the grand jury and to the defense attorney, the ruse began to fall apart, leading to 27 charges of misconduct, and eventually, disbarment.

Today, Sens. Kennedy, McCain, Reid, Lott, Graham, McConnell, and others, in concert with President Bush, are facing their own Nifong moment. Their first attempt at hoodwinking the public with a bogus immigration bill went shame face earlier this month, when the implications they tried to conceal in a vote to end debate were revealed.

Now they are back with round two leading up to the July 4 weekend with the insincere Bush pledging $4.4 billion more to demonstrate that he really (no really) is serious about "securing this border once and for all."

No, these politicians are not guilty of trying to railroad foolish young men in a titillating case for political gain, but they are culpable of conduct involving "dishonesty, fraud, deceit, or misrepresentation," which is language identical to that issued by the North Carolina Bar committee in their ruling against Nifong.

Clearly, it is talk radio that is informing an angry American public, goading Lott to bloviate that "talk radio is running America; we have to deal with that problem." Facts, a demand for explanations, and inquisitive opposition (you know, the hallmarks of democracy) are now problems to the self-impressed elites.

Does Lott blame the information, the opinions, or the radio waves for the record low Gallup Poll approval rating of 14 percent boasted by the U.S. Congress?

Graham is more thoughtless is his denunciation of the amnesty naysayers. It was he who told a recent meeting of La Raza members that "We're going to tell the bigots to shut up." Lindsay Graham-nesty as he is called by Rush Limbaugh, now has a 31 percent approval rating according to InsiderAdvantage CEO Matt Towery.

For the record, a layer of confusion has already commenced in the marketing of grand sellout II. S. 1348, the amnesty bill that was rejected in early June, now has a new number: It is S. 1639. The bill is largely the same legislation as in the original. It's the same wreck that right before the first attempt at passage, the USA Today/Gallup poll showed that by a margin of nearly 3-1, most Americans opposed it.

Here's a short list of problems that infect passage:

Some senators are honest enough to know how rotten this all is. Sen. Jim Demint, R-S.C., says of those backing the bill: "They're using procedures that have never been used in the senate . . . something doesn't smell right." Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., makes the military analogy. "They're planning with the precision of the Normandy invasion."

While the immigration battle lines are drawn for the coming week, the case ended on June 15 for Mr. Nifong. In his closing testimony, Nifong said: "My presence as the district attorney in Durham is not furthering the cause of justice. It is not fair for the people in my community to be represented by someone who is not held in high esteem by either the members of the community or members of the profession."

The professional standards for the senators who back S. 1639, and their efforts to legitimize 20 million people with the stroke of a pen, are on the line. They risk a similar fate as a now broken-down former prosecutor. While their vaunted positions have made them largely immune from scrutiny, they can no longer hide from an increasingly frustrated public who are asking the questions they don't want to hear.

Or answer.

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"It takes many good deeds to build a good reputation, and only one bad one to lose it," said Benjamin Franklin. Disgraced, disbarred, and now former Durham County prosecutor Mike Nifong can relate to this. Nifong attempted to falsely prosecute three Duke University...
Immigration's,Nifong,Moment
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2007-00-25
Monday, 25 June 2007 12:00 AM
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