Tags: Illinois | Court | Did | NOT | Accept | Dimpled | Ballots

Illinois Court Did NOT Accept Dimpled Ballots

Thursday, 23 November 2000 12:00 AM

During arguments before the Florida Supreme Court, Al Gore's attorneys claimed that an Illinois Supreme Court ruling "was a sweeping directive to count controversial 'dimpled' ballots, in which ballots were indented but not punched through," the paper reported.

But the Tribune reported that the "Illinois case should not give Democrats any confidence that dented ballots will be counted in Gore's favor. That's because the Illinois court actually affirmed a trial judge's order to exclude dented ballots, since he had decided he could not reasonably determine the voters' will by examining the ballots."

The Illinois case was referenced in Tuesday night's opinion offered by the Supreme Court, and has been trumpeted by the Gore team as a model for Florida counties engaged in the manual recount.

Attorney Burton Odelson, who represented one of the candidates in the 1990 Illinois case, told the Tribune, "The judge did not count ballots that were indented because he could not determine the voters' intent.

"From the beginning, I knew everybody [in Florida] was interpreting this case wrong and reading into it what they wanted to read into it."

The Gore team had a lawyer in the Illinois case present an affavadit to the Florida Supreme Court stating that the Illinois court had agreed dented ballots should be included.

The Tribune said the attorney's affadavit "apparently was mistaken in its assertion that such ballots were counted."

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During arguments before the Florida Supreme Court, Al Gore's attorneys claimed that an Illinois Supreme Court ruling was a sweeping directive to count controversial 'dimpled' ballots, in which ballots were indented but not punched through, the paper reported. But the...
Illinois,Court,Did,NOT,Accept,Dimpled,Ballots
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2000-00-23
Thursday, 23 November 2000 12:00 AM
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