Tags: House | Votes | Protect | U.S. | Troops | From | Globalist

House Votes to Protect U.S. Troops From Globalist Court

Tuesday, 28 May 2002 12:00 AM

The measure, sponsored by House Majority Whip Tom DeLay, R-Texas, passed by a vote of 280-138 early Friday just before the lawmakers went home for the Memorial Day recess.

Fred Gedrich, senior policy analyst at Oliver North’s Freedom Alliance, has been tracking this legislation about as carefully as anyone in Washington. He tells NewsMax.com that the DeLay amendment has the support of the White House. Key people in the State Department have told him that the specific wording is crucial for President Bush’s support.

It might be assumed that because the Bush administration has bluntly told the United Nations it has no intention of honoring the court, of course it would back Capitol Hill’s support in the form of a law on the books and on the record, "the law of the land,” if you will.

But Rep. Ron Paul, R-Texas, has been pushing for stronger language. He has complained that the House-passed measure "is silent on the ICC other than to prohibit funds authorized for international organizations from being used to advance the International Criminal Court.”

While Paul says "Hats off to DeLay” for making this important step in the right direction, he fears it "singles out one class of American citizens for protection from ICC jurisdiction [thus violating the doctrine of equal protection].” According to him, "it supposes that if the Senate ratifies the ICC treaty, [non-military] U.S. citizens would be subject to the ICC …”

Paul also has problems with the part of the DeLay amendment which he interprets as committing the U.S. to go to the rescue of military people from other non-ratifying nations who are hauled before the new court. Paul sees this as encouraging international adventurism. So in one sense, he thinks the DeLay amendment doesn’t go far enough (doesn’t protect U.S. civilians), and in another sense (rescuing allies), he believes it goes too far.

But Gedrich of Freedom Alliance, who is solidly in the loop on this issue, says although he has worked with Paul’s staff and appreciates what they do, the Texas maverick’s proposal may not be able to get White House support "because of Executive Branch foreign policy prerogatives.”

That is a credible supposition. The Bush administration has gone as far as any in recent history to fend off any erosion of presidential authority under the Constitution. One example is Attorney General John Ashcroft’s memo after Sept. 11 urging agencies to stall on Freedom of Information Requests and not to shy away from fighting such demands in court, if it comes to that.

Now, as reported by NewsMax this past week,

The ICC, and its anti-sovereignty, anti-American structure, does not register on the radar screens of most of the voters of South Dakota any more than for most Americans.

Perhaps the time has come to alert them. Daschle has a long history of talking one way back home and becoming a completely different person in Washington.

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The measure, sponsored by House Majority Whip Tom DeLay, R-Texas, passed by a vote of280-138 early Friday just before the lawmakers went home for the Memorial Day recess. Fred Gedrich, senior policy analyst at Oliver North's Freedom Alliance, has been tracking this...
House,Votes,Protect,U.S.,Troops,From,Globalist,Court
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2002-00-28
Tuesday, 28 May 2002 12:00 AM
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