Tags: Giuliani: | NYC | Safer | Than | Ever

Giuliani: NYC Safer Than Ever

Tuesday, 25 September 2001 12:00 AM

"We're going to end up with a situation where we do not recover a significant number of human remains," Giuliani said. "There are 6,398 missing, 279 identified dead, 23 police officers and 41 firefighters identified as dead."

Giuliani ended any hope that any survivors may be found in the rubble of the twin towers of the World Trade Center.

"It does recognize that we are two weeks into this terrible attack happening. But since the day after, we have not been able to recover anyone who survived," Giuliani said. "The realities are just the realities."

The mayor pointed out that crime in the city was down, following the terrorist attack on Sept. 11, but that the city's crime rate had been decreasing before that and that "the murder rate is the lowest it's been in 40 years."

"We have a 30 percent reduction over last year at this time and last year was one of the safest the city's had in about 35 years," he said. "This year it is 18 percent below last year."

Giuliani, who has prided himself on the fact that New York City's crime rate has significantly decreased since he's been mayor, bristled when asked if the deaths from the World Trade Center would be included in the city's homicide rate, that may be under 600 this year.

"The incident was a one time incident," he said. "I don't know how to describe it, as an act of war or do you describe it as a crime? I don't know."

According to the New York City police commissioner, there were four homicides in New York City from Sept. 17 through Sunday, compared with 10 during the same period last year, and that the city was maintaining a constant reduction in violent crime."

Commissioner Bernard Kerik said rape is down 6.3 percent; robbery is down nearly 17 percent; assault is down 10 percent; burglary declined another 18.1 percent; larceny is down 7 percent and auto theft decreased 20 percent, according to police statistics. Kerik noted that crime remained down despite a reduction in arrests and quality-of-life enforcement as police officers have been reassigned to other duties in the wake of the terrorist attacks. However, the visibility of National Guardsmen and police officers directing traffic in Manhattan have helped in keeping crime down, he added.

"Manhattan has got to be one of the most policed areas in the nation," said Kerik.

Giuliani has been urging New Yorkers to resume their normal lives and for city residents and tourists to again attend the theater, go to restaurants and "spend money."

About 400 lower Manhattan restaurants were forced to close after the attacks, but many are now beginning to reopen and seeing improving business, but according to the New York State Restaurant Association about 40 restaurants were destroyed as a result of the World Trade Center collapse and many restaurants have suffered major losses.

Most of the phone service to the lowest part of Manhattan was destroyed, but Verizon said it has reconnected two-thirds of the phone lines, but that 100,000 lines are still out of service.

Due to the attack, primary day was cancelled on Sept. 11 and rescheduled for Tuesday. Giuliani, who has achieved unprecedented levels of support for his handling of the crisis, said he would "think about whether to seek a third term" despite term-limit legislation.

"I do not want to get involved in the primary," Giuliani said. The mayor appeared on CBS's "Late Show with David Letterman" Monday night and said a third term "could be done but the question is whether it should be done."

The mayor added that the untold story of the terrorist attack was how New Yorkers reacted and how 25,000 to 30,000 people were saved from the burning twin towers of the World Trade Center in what "must be the largest rescue mission ever."

"I watched most of the effort. The thing that I came away with, aside from the scene of horror, was the way people acted," Giuliani said. "They evacuated quickly, orderly. They ran when they had to, but they did not trample each other. They were dignified. They were brave."

Copyright 2001 by United Press International. All rights reserved.

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We're going to end up with a situation where we do not recover a significant number of human remains, Giuliani said. There are 6,398 missing, 279 identified dead, 23 police officers and 41 firefighters identified as dead. Giuliani ended any hope that any survivors may...
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2001-00-25
Tuesday, 25 September 2001 12:00 AM
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