Tags: Few | Any | Would | Face | U.S. | Military | Tribunals

Few, if Any, Would Face U.S. Military Tribunals

Saturday, 23 February 2002 12:00 AM

"In most cases, we would prefer to have the people go back to their own countries to be tried there," Rumsfeld said at the Pentagon news briefing.

Rumsfeld said the military commission, as it is officially known, could mutate slightly to reflect the circumstances of each prospective defendant.

He also said U.S. government officials who were formulating the procedures and rules for the tribunals had reached a unanimous conclusion as to what the requirements for a death sentence would be. He would not specify what those conditions would be.

"Justice is achieved as a result of a total process," Rumsfeld said, refusing to parse the individual decisions being made on the tribunals.

An initial construct for the tribunals crafted by Defense Department lawyers suggested a death sentence would require unanimous consent by the military panel, composed of at least five U.S. officers. Guilty verdicts could be issued with a two-thirds majority, and there is a possibility defendants could appeal their verdicts to a three-officer panel.

The military holds 194 prisoners in Afghanistan and 300 at Guantanamo Bay Naval Base, Cuba.

Rumsfeld said most of the prisoners were "sorted" for interrogation for intelligence-gathering, and law enforcement officials are reviewing each prisoner's case to decide what would happen to him in the legal system.

In addition to the military tribunal, prisoners could be subjected to the U.S. criminal justice system, face a traditional military court-martial, or be sent back to their home country to face trial. They could also be released if law enforcement determines no criminal charges should be made. Those same prisoners could also be kept in detention until the conflict in Afghanistan is over so they could not rejoin the fight, standard practice in wartime, Rumsfeld said.

In a Feb. 23 interview with Britain's Daily Telegraph newspaper, Rumsfeld said the preferred option was to return prisoners to their home countries.

"I have no desire to fill up our jails and spend time and money holding people," he said. "We'd prefer to only give them back to countries that have an interest in prosecuting people that ought to be prosecuted rather than simply turning them loose, putting them back out on the street and having them go get in more airplanes and have them fly into the Pentagon and the World Trade Center again."

President Bush authorized the tribunals in November 2001.

© 2019 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

   
1Like our page
2Share
Pre-2008
In most cases, we would prefer to have the people go back to their own countries to be tried there, Rumsfeld said at the Pentagon news briefing. Rumsfeld said the military commission, as it is officially known, could mutate slightly to reflect the circumstances of each...
Few,,Any,,Would,Face,U.S.,Military,Tribunals
392
2002-00-23
Saturday, 23 February 2002 12:00 AM
Newsmax Media, Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved