Tags: Exclusive: | Gore | Popular | Vote | Fraudulent?

Exclusive: Gore Popular Vote Fraudulent?

Wednesday, 08 November 2000 12:00 AM

Conservatives, fearing that any George W. Bush victory in only the Electoral College (but not the popular vote) may leave him with a weak mandate, are prepared to challenge reports of fraud wherever it appears that Democrats may have attempted chicanery at the ballot box.

Grover Norquist, president of Americans for Tax Reform, warned before the election that the only way the Democrats could win is to cheat their way to victory.

There is too much at stake, he wrote in American Spectator. The Democrats feel they have no choice but to cheat, he told his readers. Their whole power machine will be imperiled if the GOP takes the executive and legislative branches.

In a post-election discussion with NewsMax.com, Norquist cited the cases of cigarettes as a bribe to homeless people to vote for Gore in Wisconsin (caught on camera by a Milwaukee television station), and illegal voting past a court-ordered shutdown of polling places in St. Louis as possible examples of Democrat efforts to hold on to power at all costs.

Other allegations of fraud not mentioned by Norquist centered on reported irregularities in Broward County in the "make or break" state of Florida; in California, where ballots allegedly were mailed out to illegal aliens; and in New Mexico, where a data glitch resulted in discounting 68,000 early and absentee ballots in a state that Gore supposedly won by about 3,000 to 4,000 votes.

Norquist also mentioned the abuse of power by labor union leaders, citing the Beck decision of the Supreme Court in the 1980s, which said union members could demand and get a refund for that part of their union dues used for political purposes. That decision was openly defied by organized labor.

President George Bush did not issue an executive order implementing it until the final days of his presidency. Bill Clinton, upon taking office, set the pattern of his administration’s view of the rule of law by rescinding the elder Bush’s order.

Norquist says he discussed the Beck decision with George W. Bush about a year ago and was assured then that the candidate, if elected, fully intended to issue an executive order implementing the high court’s ruling. If Bush enters the White House in January, there will be an effort to hold him to that promise.

Conservatives are divided over whether to try to repeal the Motor-Voter Law, nicknamed by critics as "the Auto-Fraudo" law, which many of them believe has served to facilitate the kind of voter fraud now being alleged.

More likely, there will be a serious effort to chip away at some of its more egregious shortcomings, such as failure to see to it that dead people are taken off the voter rolls.

But besides that, Bush supporters will try to stiffen the spine (if necessary) of George W. Bush if he does take office without a popular vote plurality or majority. They cite indications of public support for the GOP candidate on certain issues, such as Social Security reform, tort reform, and taxes, to name three. Thus, even if winning no more than the Electoral College vote, a President George W. Bush can expect to walk into 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. with strong mandates in key areas.

The above actions can be taken on "offense."

Defensively, conservatives will have to undertake an educational project to acquaint millions of Americans as to why the Founding Fathers gave us the Electoral College, and the purpose it serves to give every state a reasonable input as to the makeup of the federal government.

Millions of Americans have not been taught much about the Constitution of this nation and the principles upon with it was founded. Many will be learning for the first time, for example, that the federal government did not create the states. The states created the federal government. No doubt a quick but thorough explanation of all this history will be needed to counter expected liberal claims of "undemocratic," "archaic" election procedures or perhaps a "stolen election."

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Conservatives, fearing that any George W. Bushvictory in only the Electoral College (but not the popular vote) may leave him with a weak mandate, are prepared to challenge reports of fraud wherever it appears that Democrats may have attempted chicanery at the ballot box. ...
Exclusive:,Gore,Popular,Vote,Fraudulent?
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2000-00-08
Wednesday, 08 November 2000 12:00 AM
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