Tags: Election | Challengers | Usually | Lose

Election Challengers Usually Lose

Wednesday, 08 November 2000 12:00 AM

During the 1990s, numerous charges of voter fraud were made in political races across the country. In most of them, the accusers still lost, even after making painstaking efforts to have their allegations investigated.

Here are just some examples of voter fraud:

In the race for mayor in Miami, reports of forged signatures, fake addresses, paid vote brokers, ballot tampering and absentee ballots filed on behalf of dead people prompted a Senate committee to launch a statewide investigation into the accusations. When all was said and done, Mayor-elect Xavier Suarez found himself conceding the race to incumbent Mayor Joe Carollo.

Suarez, who was a Democrat at the time, has since changed parties and is now a Republican. Carollo is also a Republican.

The example in Florida may be the exception rather than the rule, however. In other hotly contested races where fraud was charged, NewsMax.com found the accuser still lost.

In one of the most costly congressional races ever, Rep. Michael Huffington, R-Calif., ran against Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., for a hotly contested U.S. Senate seat from California. Huffington, who poured $28 million of his personal fortune into the race, refused to concede the election.

More than 7 million votes were cast in the election, and Huffington had come to within 160,000 votes of winning, causing him to claim that voter fraud had stolen the election. Although he said he based his allegations on "substantial, credible evidence," Feinstein still won the seat.

Two years later in the same state, Rep. Bob Dornan, R-Calif., claimed voter fraud in his congressional race against Democrat challenger Loretta Sanchez. At the time, Dornan attributed his loss to absentee and provisional ballot fraud, noncitizen voting and insecurely handled ballot boxes.

During a recount, which was financed by Dornan, election workers identified 126 absentee ballots which were submitted improperly and another 340 unaccounted-for ballots. The Dornan camp also claimed to have evidence of as many as 2,500 people who had voted improperly.

Although three state and local agencies initiated investigations into Dornan's charges, Dornan still lost the seat by a mere 984 votes.

During the same election period in which Dornan lost, another charge of voter fraud was being pursued in Louisiana. The race in that state involved a seat for the U.S. Senate. The Republican candidate was Louis "Woody" Jenkins, and the Democrat candidate was Mary Landrieu.

Although nobody accused Landrieu herself of fraud, attorney Neal Hogan, who conducted an on-scene probe, said that probable cause existed to believe that "large-scale violations of federal and state election law have occurred." The most serious of these violations were the purchasing of votes, multiple voting and the casting of fraudulent votes.

Jenkins and his volunteers, not ready to give up the election, had gathered more than 8000 pages of affidavits and exhibits, claiming to have identified 7454 illegal or "phantom" votes. Even so, Jenkins lost the election by 5,788 votes out of more than 1.7 million votes cast.

In the 1994 Maryland gubernatorial race, Republican candidate Ellen R. Sauerbrey also would not concede the race to Democrat Parris N. Glendening. The race, which was very close, seemed somewhat suspicious as well because exactly 6,000 votes separated the two candidates. The Sauerbrey campaign pursued allegations of voting irregularities for some time, but to no avail. Glendening became the state's newest governor.

Although voter fraud challenges in political races across the nation haven't fared well over the past decade, much more is at stake in this presidential contest. And out of all the examples of voter fraud challenges NewsMax.com was able to uncover, only one challenge – in Florida – was successful.

Now, the nation's attention – and the attention of the world – is focused on Florida. Will another voter fraud challenge be successful in the state? Only time will tell.

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During the 1990s, numerous charges of voter fraud were made in political races across the country. In most of them, the accusers still lost, even after making painstaking efforts to have their allegations investigated. Here are just some examples of voter fraud: In...
Election,Challengers,Usually,Lose
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2000-00-08
Wednesday, 08 November 2000 12:00 AM
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