Tags: Easter | 2006

Easter 2006

Tuesday, 11 April 2006 12:00 AM

Somebody was interviewing me the other day, seeking biographical information for possible inclusion in one of those many "Who's Who" volumes kicking around. In the course of the conversation my interviewer asked me where I could see myself five years from now. He was shocked – shocked! – when I said "In the cemetery at my parish church."

I don't know what he expected a man in his 80th year to say, but he stammered and tried to assure me that I had lots of good years left. The idea of anybody recognizing his mortality and accepting the reality that one's span of years has limits was beyond his comprehension. Like the great majority of his fellow Americans, not only is the mention of death to be avoided, but so, too, at all costs, is death itself.

In the eyes of today's secularized society, death is seen as mankind's greatest enemy, and the prolongation of life the greatest goal, unless of course the life is that of an unborn child and therefore expendable. This great denial that we are all of us embarked on an irreversible journey that leads us to the grave is the inevitable result of the Utopian vision that leads to a denial of the law of consequences. And death is the consequence of birth.

This Sunday Christians will observe Easter, which celebrates the victory our Lord won for us over death. By rising from the dead he made it possible for us to follow Him into a better world beyond the grave.

Nowadays, however, in reveling in the glory of the Resurrection we tend to forget that without Good Friday there could be no Easter. Easter is the consequence of the Cross, and as devotees of the Utopian vision, we reject the inevitability of consequence. We would much prefer to have Easter without the agony of Golgotha.

We flinch from the idea of suffering, rejecting the Christian concept of its redemptive power. In its extreme reaction to the very notion of suffering that rejection breeds such Utopian remedies as euthanasia, where death becomes desirable.

Just a year ago the world witnessed the death of a man who bore his suffering as a gift, struggling with a body that turned on him, robbed him of the most rudimentary functions such as coherent speech and mobility, and inflicted terrible pain on him. Yet rather than retreat in the face of his several maladies and seek whatever comfort he could find in solitude, he lifted his cross and carried it across the world.

Nobody likes to suffer. But like death, suffering is a consequence of life. It's unavoidable. One of the great lessons Pope John Paul II gave us was to show us how to transform suffering into a gift that enables us to reach out and share with Christ the agony of His passion and death.

On Sunday, as we rejoice in the victory of Christ's conquest of death, it behooves us to reflect on the events that came before, on Good Friday. It was the Cross that made possible the empty tomb. It will be our crosses that will help lead us to union with our risen Lord.

Happy Easter.

Phil Brennan is a veteran journalist who writes for NewsMax.com. He is editor & publisher of Wednesday on the Web (http://www.pvbr.com) and was Washington columnist for National Review magazine in the 1960s. He also served as a staff aide for the House Republican Policy Committee and helped handle the Washington public relations operation for the Alaska Statehood Committee which won statehood for Alaska. He is also a trustee of the Lincoln Heritage Institute and a member of the Association of Former Intelligence Officers

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Somebody was interviewing me the other day, seeking biographical information for possible inclusion in one of those many "Who's Who" volumes kicking around. In the course of the conversation my interviewerasked me where I could see myself five years from now. He was shocked...
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Tuesday, 11 April 2006 12:00 AM
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