Tags: Disengagement | Opponents | Mull | Strategy

Disengagement Opponents Mull Strategy

Thursday, 31 March 2005 12:00 AM

Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's disengagement plan, approved by the Knesset, requires Israeli settlers to start leaving their homes on July 20. The evacuation process will take four to six weeks, authorities say.

Sharon has described his disengagement plan as a security measure intended to minimize friction with the Palestinians and redeploy Israeli forces along new security lines.

Having exhausted all legislative means to halt what they see as a retreat from Gaza, leaders of the anti-disengagement movement pledged earlier this week to take their battle to the streets.

"We will take a few days off and think about it [and] see what will be our position," said Michael Ratzon, a Likud party member opposed to the disengagement.

The "rebels" must decide whether to join the street protests - or "try to calm down the fire," Ratzon said.

Israeli authorities have expressed concern about the potential for violence on the streets as well as the possibility of civil war in the country.

"Unfortunately [civil war] could happen but we must do whatever we can...to prevent this civil war," said Ratzon.

Shaul Goldstein, the mayor of Gush Etzion, a large settlement bloc 10 minutes from Jerusalem, and a spokesman for the Jewish communities in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, said protesters would employ every non-violent, "legal and legitimate" means to demonstrate on country's highways.

"We are going to be on the street everywhere to show the public we didn't give up, [that it is] not legitimate to uproot people from their homes when everything is legal," said Goldstein.

All 21 communities in the Gaza Strip and the four in the West Bank are legal -- the residents sent there by various Israeli governments, some as many as 30 years ago. Even Sharon has been an advocate of the settlement movement.

Palestinians want to establish a state of their own in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, where some 240,000 Israelis now live.

More than 9,000 Israelis, most in the Gaza Strip, are being forced to relocate under the disengagement plan.

"We have the right to protest...but we understand the chances to succeed are very small," said Goldstein. "We hope God will send us a miracle."

Goldstein said he does not believe there will be civil war in Israel. The worst that could happen is a "tear in society," he said.

Reserve Major General Jacob Amidror, who is opposed to the disengagement plan, said he does not believe that disengagement will produce a civil war in Israel.

"This is very huge exaggeration," Amidror said, although he admitted the evacuation "is not going to be easy."

For many people it will break their "ideological dream" of settling the entire land of Israel, Amidror said.

Many Israelis believe that God promised the Jewish people the land of Israel, including the West Bank, which they call Judea and Samaria, as well as the Gaza Strip for an eternal inheritance.

For those who dreamed about the whole land of Israel being in Jewish hands, it will be a "huge problem," Amidror said.

103

© 2019 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

   
1Like our page
2Share
Pre-2008
Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's disengagement plan, approved by the Knesset, requires Israeli settlers to start leaving their homes on July 20. The evacuation process will take four to six weeks, authorities say. Sharon has described his disengagement plan as a security...
Disengagement,Opponents,Mull,Strategy
507
2005-00-31
Thursday, 31 March 2005 12:00 AM
Newsmax Media, Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved