Tags: Democratic | Run-off | NYC | Primary

Democratic Run-off in NYC Primary

Wednesday, 26 September 2001 12:00 AM

With less than half of the precincts reporting, Ferrer and Green had about 35 percent of the vote, shy of the 40 percent needed to avoid a runoff. The runoff is the first for mayor in New York City since 1977, when Ed Koch defeated Mario M. Cuomo.

The primaries began Sept. 11, but were delayed within hours after the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center. "In that hour of horror and the aftermath, we re-learned two inspiring lessons about our city," Green said. "We really are one people and one city, with one future based on a common experience, with the obligation to seek common ground; and second, many of us who visit 'Ground Zero' are struck not only by the devastation, but also by the enduring twin towers of our city - our altruism and our heroism."

Ferrer told his supporters that it was not time to rejoice, but a time to renew.

"Even as we recover our victims from the rubble we understand that rebuilding our devastated financial district is not just an economic imperative, it's a spiritual imperative as well," he said. "I heartily congratulate Mark Green on his campaign, and look forward to seeing more of him in the weeks to come. We're going to get real close as we share our ideas and our ideals with all the people of New York."

On the Republican side, Bloomberg won with 66 percent of the vote over former City University of New York Chairman Herman Badillo and will appear on the GOP line for mayor on Election Day Nov. 6. "This city is at a crossroads," Bloomberg told his supporters.

"It's time to step back and consider the monumental task ahead. All of a sudden, what New York City needs has changed, and changed dramatically. We've weathered the crisis and now we face the rebuilding-an enterprise no city has ever faced before."

The unofficial returns did not include write-in ballots, which the board of elections will count eventually, but they will not have an impact on the primary outcome. There were at least 15,000 absentee ballots to be counted but according to the board of elections, they will not have am impact on the primary.

As in most New York primaries, turnout was expected to be low and only a small part of the city's 2.4 million registered Democrats were expected to vote.

Republican New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani closed the door on being a write-in candidate in the mayoral primary Sept. 25, but he not completely close the door on the election. The mayor is barred from a third term as mayor because of term-limit legislation which he supported. However, his handling of the crisis of the terrorist attacks has resulted in soaring approval ratings in the 90s and many have said that they would want him to remain longer to run the city and rebuild lower Manhattan. "I need time to reflect on what I am going to do and I have not had time to think about it and it would not involve the primary anyway," Giuliani said at a news conference Monday.

According to the New York state Board of Elections, two things would have to happen if Guiliani wanted to seek a third term. The City Council of New York City could rescind the term-limit law that allows two four-year terms, or the New York State Legislature could rescind the term-limit law. The state would also have to enact a way for Giuliani to get on the ballot or he could be a write-in candidate in the general election.

The mayor appeared on CBS's "Late Show with David Letterman" Monday night and said a third term "could be done but the question is whether it should be done."

Copyright 2001 by United Press International. All rights reserved.

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With less than half of the precincts reporting, Ferrer and Green had about 35 percent of the vote, shy of the 40 percent needed to avoid a runoff. The runoff is the first for mayor in New York City since 1977, when Ed Koch defeated Mario M. Cuomo. The primaries began Sept....
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2001-00-26
Wednesday, 26 September 2001 12:00 AM
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