Tags: Congressional | Intelligence | Leaks

Congressional Intelligence Leaks

Sunday, 13 March 2005 12:00 AM

"Loose lips sink ships" was (and is) a military admonition of caution.

A few years ago leaks of classified information prompted the president to limit top-secret briefings to just eight House and Senate leaders. Some may argue that's eight too many ... or 92 too few.

There ARE consequences to what we do and don't do, and nowhere more so than in the arena of intelligence.

If one offends the sensibilities of political correctness, the immediate draconian consequences are axiomatic: Crucify the bastard! However, if ‘certain people' outrageously break the law, policy and procedures with intelligence matters, accountability drifts on the wind of partisan proclivities.

In December 2004 intelligence types were allegedly seeking a criminal investigation into the outing of a top-secret spy-satellite program by some disagreeable Democrat senators.

The Bush administration was major league torqued over leaks about a new covert generation of satellites.

The premature, inappropriate congressional brain flatulence was articulated by Senators Jay Rockefeller and Ron Wyden. Although the petty partisan hacks didn't ID the satellite program or give details, a Washington Post follow-up identified the program for what it is. The details included in the Post make clear that people with intimate knowledge of the program leaked details.

"At a minimum, what they did was irresponsible," said an official.

It was way more.

Once upon a time discussions were under way about whether to ask Senate Republicans to consider removing Rockefeller and Wyden from the committee. That was

Despite the vacuous incompetence of the Senate Ethics Committee (as worthless as mammary glands on a bull), in the interest of maintaining the fiction of credibility, the ‘form' of an investigation should have been imperative.

Meanwhile, a criminal grand jury allegedly is still looking into whether former National Security Advisor Sandy Berger should be charged for removal of documents from the National Archives. This is (or should be) a big deal:

Meanwhile, Sandy says he made "an honest mistake." BULLFEATHERS! It was neither "honest" NOR a "mistake." That he got caught ... THAT was the mistake.

The unaccountability and lack of consequences for egregious (criminal?) ineptitude is, sadly, routine in the 87 square miles surrounded by reality.

Senator Pat Leahy was annoyed with the Reagan administration's war on terrorism in the 1980s. At the time he was vice chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee.

He should have been indicted, tried and sentenced.

Leahy's Iran-Contra leak was considered to be one of the most serious breaches of secrecy in the Intelligence Committee's 10-year history. But that was before Senator Richard Shelby leaked that we were tapping Osama bin Laden's satellite phone. Bin Laden immediately stopped using it, denying us the opportunity to find and kill the s.o.b.

Cicero said: "A nation can survive its fools, even the ambitious. But it cannot survive treason from within … for the traitor appears not a traitor. … He rots the soul of a nation … he infects the body politic so that it can no longer resist."

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"Loose lips sink ships" was (and is) a military admonition of caution. A few years ago leaks of classified information prompted the president to limit top-secret briefings to just eight House and Senate leaders. Some may argue that's eight too many ... or 92 too...
Congressional,Intelligence,Leaks
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2005-00-13
Sunday, 13 March 2005 12:00 AM
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