Tags: Confidence | Government

No Confidence in Government

Wednesday, 27 June 2007 12:00 AM

The United States today faces a no confidence issue in both its executive and legislative branches.

The United Kingdom quite often faces a no confidence vote in parliament and the simple solution is the calling of an election to take place six weeks hence.

America has no such simple answer. The next election is nearly 17 months away.

The confidence level (as of June 21) of 25 percent public approval of both President Bush and the U.S. Congress is one of the lowest levels of public acceptance in 35 years. Disapproval comes in at 63 percent.

The much vaunted leadership change brought about by the 2006 congressional elections has settled down to little more than far-left rhetoric. The newly elected leaders ran on an anti-Bush, anti-war platform offering no substance for the benefit of the American public. The congressional far left campaigned in a vacuum of ideas and, not surprisingly, is attempting to govern from a vacuum.

Both the Congress and the executive branch are at odds with the U.S. public with respect to the most over-riding issue of the day, immigration. Sixty percent of the U.S. public is opposed to the amnesty proposals in the present Senate bill 1639.

The Congress passed legislation to provide 700 miles of fence along the Mexican border and then failed to fund the construction. In the most recent Senate Bill 1639, under debate today, President Bush agreed to support an amendment that will provide an additional 4.4 billion dollars to fund the 700-mile fence and add variously 10,000 to 18,000 more border patrol guards for surveillance duties on the Mexican Border.

Webster defines surveillance as "watch kept over a person." This definition could be expanded to "watch kept over a person crossing the border." In 2005, President Bush added 9,000 National Guard troops to surveillance duty along the Mexican border with little or no effect.

Most of the 4.4 billion dollar appropriation will be commitments that will require financing in like amounts year after year. A one-time commitment of 4.4 billion dollars would build a barrier fence two times over without repeat financing year after year.

Illegal immigration must be stopped! Only a barrier can do this in the form of a wall or a fence designed to stop illegal aliens on the spot. It would appear that America's government languishes on dead center.

Dramatic action will be required by one side or the other to return the United States to normal government operation. At present the far-left leadership of Congress seems intent on stopping the war in Iraq.

President Bush will veto that.

The President has requested an energy program that opens offshore and Alaskan oil reserves for development. Congress has vetoed that possibility. Both the U.S. Senate and the President want a comprehensive immigration bill that effectively provides amnesty to 12 million to 20 million illegal aliens presently in the United States. Sixty-three percent of the American public is opposed to that. There is one possibility remaining that would dramatically change the political landscape and solve one of America's most serious problems. President George Bush does not have to seek permission from Congress, the Supreme Court or anyone else. The U.S. Constitution grants President Bush the right to declare a national emergency with respect to the present and impending energy crisis in the United States.

Energy costs, the increasing percentage of imported oil from potential enemies and increasing instability of world energy conditions represent a clear and present danger to the health, welfare and security of U.S. citizens.

Based on this information, the attorney general can produce a finding — a finding that would "constitute a clear and present danger to the health, welfare and safety of the citizens of the United States."

Evidence to produce such a finding is everywhere:

In addition, there would be a question as to whether or not America had the natural resources to wage a war and successfully fight terrorism at home and abroad.

President Bush should have no concern as to whether or not such action would in any way damage his public approval rating.

Such dramatic action on the part of President Bush would energize the American public to the extent that confidence would again be restored to the American government.

E. Ralph Hostetter, a prominent businessman and agricultural publisher, also is a national and local award-winning columnist. He welcomes comments by email sent to eralphhostetter@yahoo.com.

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The United States today faces a no confidence issue in both its executive and legislative branches. The United Kingdom quite often faces a no confidence vote in parliament and the simple solution is the calling of an election to take place six weeks hence. America has...
Confidence,Government
733
2007-00-27
Wednesday, 27 June 2007 12:00 AM
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