Tags: Clear | Leader | NYC | Primary

No Clear Leader in NYC Primary

Tuesday, 11 September 2001 12:00 AM

In fact, undecided voters outnumber some of the candidate's poll numbers as four Democrats battle to gain their party's nomination to run in the November election.

One of the most recent polls, by New York Report, found Public Advocate Mark Green with 28 percent of the mayoral primary vote, followed by Bronx Borough President Fernando Ferrer at 20 percent. City Council Speaker Peter Vallone and city Comptroller Alan Hevesi were tied with 14 percent. Another poll released on Friday had Ferrer and Green, in a statistical dead heat.

If no candidate gets more than 40 percent of the vote, a two-man run-off will decide the party race. In the Republican primary, media owner Mike Bloomberg is facing off against former City University of New York chairman Herman Badillo - both former Democrats. All of the Democrats have spent most of their careers in public service yet many of them are still not recognized by the voters and many voters have described the race for the job some consider one of the toughest jobs in politics as "drab and dull."

Part of the reason for the lack of excitement in the race is the crowded pack of candidates but perhaps any race would appear dull after following Republican Mayor Rudolph Giuliani. His eight-year record as mayor has left little for the candidates to do and many of them have been competing on how they would "continue" the mayor's record and policies.

During the mayor's two terms, New York went from the nation's crime capital to the safest major city in America. The city gained 400,000 new jobs, businesses boomed and its population grew to a record amount of more than 8 million people.

Education and crime have been the key issues in the race for the Democratic primary.

Green wants to take $300 million in police overtime and put it toward tuition assistance for young officers because "education reduces brutality."

Ferrer, who was endorsed by Al Sharpton - the most vocal leader against racial profiling - wants to initiate stricter discipline for police brutality, restore community policing and punish racial profiling. Hevesi wants to impose city residency for new police officers, increase training and use video cameras and other technology to address police brutality.

Vallone, who was endorsed by the Police Benevolent Association, wants to create an independent commission to monitor abuses, increase officers on the street by increasing civilians for desk jobs and rehabbing old precincts.

On the Republican side, Badillo wants to increase minority hiring and require sensitivity training for entire 40,000-New York Police Department, while Bloomberg wants to focus on specialized units over community policing and place all stop-and-frisk data on the Internet.

-- Copyright 2001 by United Press International. All rights reserved.

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In fact, undecided voters outnumber some of the candidate's poll numbers as four Democrats battle to gain their party's nomination to run in the November election. One of the most recent polls, by New York Report, found Public Advocate Mark Green with 28 percent of the...
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2001-00-11
Tuesday, 11 September 2001 12:00 AM
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