Tags: Civil | Rights | for | Behavior

Civil Rights for Behavior

Saturday, 23 November 2002 12:00 AM

Last week in Chicago, at the mayor's behest, the City Council proposed and approved slightly raised fines for those Chicagoans who would use profanity. A cussing tirade could now cost you $300.

Now if this were the end of the story, it might be worth praising. This attempt by Richard M. Daley to clean up the foul-mouthed homeless people on the streets, or the all-too-boozed Bears fans in the upper bleachers, or the motorist who out of anger lets a policeman "have it" for interrupting a tight time schedule might be seen as admirable and moral. The problem is it is completely inconsistent with what the mayor really is all about.

I suppose the supporters of Mayor Daley would say, "Hey, why are you knocking him around for wanting to protect your kids from being exposed to such vulgarity?"

The point of those who would pose such a question would be reinforced, however, if they could convince King Richard that vulgarity and obscenity spewing forth from these few citizens per year is relatively insignificant given the other actions that the mayor has or has not taken.

Such as ...?

That same City Council just last week voted to approve that language based on "behavior" or "expression" would be enough to protect someone from being discriminated against. What kind of behavior? Well, the kind that up till only recently would be found in X-rated entertainment. Behavior that was considered by the American Psychiatric Association as "deviant."

For years, as I have debated the most radical homosexual activists, the argument they continue to make is "But we are born this way." Of course, now that science has all but shut down that line of argument completely, the strategists in the radical homosexual activist arena say, "Change the strategy." And with the help of King Richard, they are.

There are now a total of 51 jurisdictions across America that give protections from discrimination based on "behavior." In other words, it's not genetic makeup that entitles one to favored status under the law – but what a person does. Behavior is action. Behavior is a choice in how I 'act out' when given the chance to.

Homosexuals for the longest time argued, "Let may behavior be mine in my own bedroom." Now they argue, "Let me act how I want in public." And yes, that includes in front of your children. Eventually they will want to try to argue that if you cannot discriminate on the basis of behavior, then a church cannot tell a staff member, who may be 'acting out' on his own time, that he is fired.

In other words, the shift to start assigning "civil rights" based on how a person acts – and not because of how a person was born – becomes perhaps the most dangerous public policy paradigm that could occur.

But King Richard didn't stop there.

Last summer the mighty mayor had the chance to address the issue of protecting our kids in the city's public libraries. Currently pedophiles, rapists and child molesters regularly view porn in the city libraries and then seek ways to act out on their sexual impulses. Library attendants have been threatened. Children have been harmed. And the clergy in Chicago have raised their heads in protest. All to no avail.

No, I'm sad to say that King Richard cares as much for the good of children in Chicago as does an obese person who is hungry cares about the rights of a candy bar. They are means to an end. It's just too bad that the only way the mayor feels he can win re-election is by consuming the average working men and women who helped put him there, and even their kids.

Cussers, look out; pedophiles, transvestites and Chicago Democrats, rest easy. King Daley's got your back!

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Last week in Chicago, at the mayor's behest, the City Council proposed and approved slightly raised fines for those Chicagoans who would use profanity. A cussing tirade could now cost you $300. Now if this were the end of the story, it might be worth praising. This...
Civil,Rights,for,Behavior
637
2002-00-23
Saturday, 23 November 2002 12:00 AM
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