Tags: Chinese | Spy | Ships | Breach | Japanese | and | Philippine

Chinese Spy Ships Breach Japanese and Philippine Waters

Sunday, 08 April 2001 12:00 AM

Yet, the fact is that China has been busy in the past 12 months flexing its military muscle and bullying American allies in Asia.

In September 2000, Tokyo issued a formal protest to Beijing because People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) vessels entered Japanese territorial waters. According to the Japanese navy, a Chinese spy ship penetrated inside the international 12-mile limit.

Tokyo also complained to Beijing that armed Chinese warships, escorting the spy ship, also breached Japanese territorial waters during an August PLAN war game.

The incident, according to Japanese military sources, involved a Chinese "spy" ship equipped with sophisticated electronic monitoring devices. Chinese navy electronic warfare ships are operated under the direct command of the People's Liberation Army Headquarters 4th Department located just outside Beijing.

The Chinese navy war game reportedly raised serious concerns inside Japanese military circles because it demonstrated that China intends to blockade Japan during an invasion of Taiwan.

The Chinese spy ship incident is but one of a series of monthly intrusions into the waters of U.S. allies. The Philippines, a critical U.S. ally in the Pacific, has suffered the most abuse at the hands of Beijing.

In March 2001, the Philippine navy forced 10 Chinese vessels from Scarborough Shoal, a rocky outcrop in the South China Sea. In order to avoid diplomatic problems, the Philippine navy forced the vessels to leave instead of seizing them.

According to sources inside the Philippine military, China was secretly building structures on the shoal. Beijing immediately issued protests over the incident and claimed that the shoal was "under its control."

Philippine military officials noted that U.S. forces also frequently use the shoal as an impact area and gunnery range. American military forces based at Clark Air Force Base and Subic Naval Base use the shoal for live bombing exercises, as does the Philippine air force.

The incident, according to military sources inside Manila, is part of a secret Beijing operation to neutralize by any means possible the oldest U.S. ally in the Far East. The Chinese navy frequently breaches Philippine territorial waters and often aims radar-seeking missiles at Philippine civil and military aircraft.

"Beijing is trying to 'Panama' us," stated one source inside the Philippine military.

According to top Philippine intelligence officials, Beijing's war against the Philippines includes bribery, drugs and gambling. In March, the Philippines' national security adviser said, "China is the biggest source of illegal drugs and Chinese army officers are involved in narcotics trafficking."

U.S. defense analysts agree that the Philippine military is hardly a match for China's multimillion-man force of ships, planes and soldiers. Yet, the Philippines acted as a responsible nation in not holding hostage Chinese soldiers who breached its sovereign territory.

China is trying to portray itself as a tiny, benevolent Asian nation being pushed around by the big bad U.S.A. Our allies in the Pacific know different by hard experience. Tokyo and Manila are painfully aware that Beijing is lying. The People's Liberation Army is holding America hostage.

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Yet, the fact is that China has been busy in the past 12 months flexing its military muscle and bullying American allies in Asia. In September 2000, Tokyo issued a formal protest to Beijing because People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) vessels entered Japanese...
Chinese,Spy,Ships,Breach,Japanese,and,Philippine,Waters
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2001-00-08
Sunday, 08 April 2001 12:00 AM
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